The Laws of the Web: Patterns in the Ecology of Information

Front Cover
MIT Press, 2001 - Computers - 115 pages
1 Review

Despite its haphazard growth, the Web hides powerful underlying regularities -- from the organization of its links to the patterns found in its use by millions of users. Many of these regularities have been predicted on the basis of theoretical models based on a field of physics -- statistical mechanics -- that few would have thought applicable to the social domain.In this book, Bernardo Huberman explains in accessible language the laws of the Web. One of the foremost researchers in the field, Huberman has established, for example, that the surfing patterns of individuals are describable by a precise law. Such findings can lead to more efficient Web design and use. They also shed light on social mechanisms whose significance goes beyond the Web. In this sense, the Web is a gigantic informational ecosystem that can be used to quantify and test explanations of human behavior and social interaction.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Ecology
1
The Phenomenon of the Web
7
Evolution and Structure
19
Small Worlds
33
As We Surf
41
Social Dilemmas and Internet Congestion
55
Downloading Information
71
Markets and the Web
83
Epilogue
97
References
101
Index
103
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

Bernardo A. Huberman is an HP Fellow at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories in Palo Alto, California.

Bibliographic information