Free Men All: The Personal Liberty Laws of the North, 1780-1861

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1974 - Law - 253 pages
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Examines the Impact of the Idealism of the Personal Liberty Laws of Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, Ohio and Wisconsin The Personal Liberty Laws reflected the social ethical commitment to freedom from slavery and as such were among the bricks that laid the foundation for the Fourteenth Amendment. Morris examines those statutes as enacted in the five representative states Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, Ohio and Wisconsin, and argues that these laws were an alternative to the violence allowed by the southern slave codes and the extreme abolitionist viewpoints of the north. Thomas D. Morris [1938-] taught in the Department of History, Portland State University and is the author of Southern Slavery and the Law, 1619-1860. CONTENTS I. Slavery and Emancipation: the Rise of Conflicting Legal Systems II. Kidnapping and Fugitives: Early State and Federal Responses III. State "Interposition" 1820-1830: Pennsylvania and New York IV. Assaults Upon the Personal Liberty Laws V. The Antislavery Counterattack VI. The Personal Liberty Laws in the Supreme Court: Prigg v. Pennsylvania VII. The Pursuit of a Containment Policy, 1842-1850 VII. The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 IX. Positive Law, Higher Law, and the Via Media X. Interposition, 1854-1858 XI. Habeas Corpus and Total Repudiation 1859-1860 XII. Denouement Appendix Bibliography Index
 

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Contents

Chapter
1
The Pursuit of a Containment Policy 18421850
107
The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850
130
Appendix
219
Index
247
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Page 16 - There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted : Provided always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed, and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid.
Page 13 - The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only [by] positive law...
Page 285 - Stimson, Frederic Jesup. Glossary of Technical Terms, Phrases, and Maxims of the Common Law. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1881. iv, 305pp. Reprinted 1999 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-886363-70-6. Cloth.
Page 15 - Full faith and credit shall be given in each of these States to the records, acts, and judicial proceedings, of the courts and magistrates of every other State.
Page 284 - The Doctor and Student or Dialogues Between a Doctor of Divinity and a Student in the Laws of England...

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About the author (1974)

Thomas D. Morris, professor of history at Portland State University, is author of "Free Men All: The Personal Liberty Laws of the North, 1780-1861".

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