African American and Cherokee Nurses in Appalachia: A History, 1900-1965

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McFarland, Feb 19, 2016 - Health & Fitness - 240 pages
Few career opportunities were available to minority women in Appalachia in the first half of the 20th century. Nursing offered them a respected, relatively well paid profession and—as few physicians or hospitals would treat people of color—their work was important in challenging health care inequities in the region. Working in both modern surgical suites and tumble-down cabins, these women created unprecedented networks of care, managed nursing schools and built professional nursing organizations while navigating discrimination in the workplace. Focusing on the careers and contributions of dozens of African American and Eastern Band Cherokee registered nurses, this first comprehensive study of minority nurses in Appalachia documents the quality of health care for minorities in the region during the Jim Crow era. Racial segregation in health care and education and state and federal policies affecting health care for Native Americans are examined in depth.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Historical Overview of Segregated Health Care in Appalachia
5
History of Individual States and the Qualla Boundary
51
Epilogue
186
Timeline of Events in African American and Cherokee Nursing in Appalachia 19001965
191
List of Registered Nurses by State 18971965
196
References
211
Index
225
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About the author (2016)

Phoebe Ann Pollitt has practiced nursing in Appalachia for more than 30 years. She is an associate professor of nursing at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. Her professional research interests are nursing history and health disparities.

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