The Red House Mystery

Front Cover
Penguin Random House, 2009 - Fiction - 211 pages

TRY A VINTAGE MURDER MYSTERY

Far from the gentle slopes of the Hundred Acre Wood lies The Red House, the setting for A.A Milne's only detective story, where secret passages, uninvited guests, a sinister valet and a puzzling murder lay the foundations for a classic crime caper. And when the local police prove baffled, it is up to a guest at a local inn to appoint himself 'Sherlock Holmes' and, together with his friend and loyal 'Watson', delve deeper into the mysteries of the dead man.

The Red House Mystery is a lost gem from a time before Tigger and a perfectly crafted whodunit with witty dialogue, deft plotting and a most curious cast of characters.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Pauntley - LibraryThing

Too small a cast of characters for a Whodunnit - it’s a Whydiddydoit, resolved in the end by the murderer’s epistolary confession. Country house mystery. Period charm and engaging prose with a pair of jolly pipe smoking chaps, guests of the murdered host, playing at Holmes and Watson. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - rainpebble - LibraryThing

The Red House Mystery by A.A. Milne; (4*); (44) A typical 'locked room mystery', this novel features characters who may not be all they seem to be or may perhaps may be more than they seem to be. Each ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Alan Alexander Milne was born in Hampstead in 1882 and attended an independent school run by his father before studying mathematics at Cambridge. After university he worked as an Assistant Editor at the magazine Punch and established himself as a successful author of both plays and novels, including The Red House Mystery until, with the publication of When We Were Very Young in 1924 and Winnie-the-Pooh in 1926 his career took a very different turn. Milne continued to produce works for adults but occasionally resented the success of his children's stories, which overshadowed much of his other work.

In 1952 A. A. Milne suffered a stroke after brain surgery and retired to his country home in Sussex as an invalid. He died there four years later.

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