Measuring Access to Learning Opportunities

Front Cover
Since 1968 the Elementary and Secondary School Civil Rights Compliance Report (known as the E&S survey) has been used to gather information about possible disparities in access to learning opportunities and violations of students’ civil rights. Thirty-five years after the initiation of the E&S survey, large disparities remain both in educational outcomes and in access to learning opportunities and resources. These disparities may reflect violations of students’ civil rights, the failure of education policies and practices to provide students from all backgrounds with a similar educational experience, or both. They may also reflect the failure of schools to fully compensate for disparities and current differences in parents’ education, income, and family structure.

The Committee on Improving Measures of Access to Equal Educational Opportunities concludes that the E&S survey continues to play an essential role in documenting these disparities and in providing information that is useful both in guiding efforts to protect students’ civil rights and for informing educational policy and practice. The committee also concludes that the survey’s usefulness and access to the survey data could be improved.

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Contents

Executive Summary
1
Introduction
7
The Role of the ES Survey
19
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Willis D. Hawley is Professor of Education and Public Affairs at the Univer-sity of Maryland, where he served as Dean of the College of Education from 1993 to 1998. He taught at Yale, Duke, and Vanderbilt universities before going to Maryland. He has published numerous books, articles, and book chapters dealing with teacher education, school reform, urban politics, po-litical learning, organizational change, school desegregation, and educa-tional policy. His most recent research deals with the professional develop-ment of teachers, the education of teachers (in the United States and Japan), school restructuring and effectiveness, family influences on the academic performance of Southeast Asian children in the United States, and race re-lations. He has served as consultant to numerous public agencies, includ-ing the Executive Office of the President, the U.S. Senate, the U.S. Depart-ment of Education, and the World Bank, as well as many state and local governments, foundations, and professional associations. He also organized and directs the Common Destiny Alliance, a coalition of national organi-zations and scholars interested in using research to improve intergroup relations.

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