Elite Politics in Contemporary China

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M.E. Sharpe, 2001 - Political Science - 167 pages
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Little attention has been devoted to studying Chinese politics at the elite, or national, level. It is particularly important to pay attention to the elite level at a time when Dengist China has given way to the Jiang Zemin era, when issues of China's role in the world stir controversy, and debates about China's "democratization" are prevalent. This book, by one of the leading Western authorities on the subject, describes China's national political climate in a manner that seeks to abstract the political dynamic at work.
 

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Contents

Introduction
xi
The Dengist Reforms in Historical Perspective
3
Formal Structures Informal Politics and Political Change in China1
35
Institution Building and Democratization in China
61
The Impact of Reform on Elite Politics
86
Historical Echoes and Chinese Politics Can China Leave the Twentieth Century Behind?
118
Index
155
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About the author (2001)

Joseph Fewsmith is Professor of International Relations and Political Science at Boston University. He is the author of China since Tiananmen: From Deng Xiaoping to Hu Jintao (2008), which is the second edition of China since Tiananmen (2001); Elite Politics in Contemporary China (2001); The Dilemmas of Reform in China: Political Conflict and Economic Debate (1994); and Party, State, and Local Elites in Republican China: Merchant Organizations and Politics in Shanghai, 1980 1930 (1985). He is the editor of China Today, China Tomorrow (2010) and co-editor, with Zheng Yongnian, of China's Opening Society (2008). He is very active in the China field, traveling to China frequently and presenting papers at professional conferences such as the Association for Asian Studies and the American Political Science Association. His articles have appeared in such journals as The China Quarterly, Asian Survey, The Journal of Contemporary China, Modern China and Comparative Studies in Society and History. He is one of seven regular contributors to China Leadership Monitor, a quarterly web publication analyzing current developments in China. He is also an associate of the John King Fairbank Center for East Asian Studies at Harvard University and of the Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer Range Future at Boston University.

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