Pugsley's New Guide to the United States Local Inspectors Examination of Masters and Mates: Of Ocean-going Steam and Sailing Ships, Containing All Useful Information and Explaining how to Find Latitude and Longitude by Observation, and Many Other Useful Calculations Not Included in the Examination,

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R.M. Pugsley, 1917 - Merchant marine - 287 pages
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Page 257 - In obeying and construing these rules due regard shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision, and to any special circumstances which may render a departure from the above rules necessary in order to avoid immediate danger.
Page 57 - When a vessel is in distress and requires assistance from other vessels or from the shore the following shall be the signals to be used or displayed by her, either together or separately, namely : In the daytime — First. A gun or other explosive signal fired at intervals of about a minute.
Page 254 - A vessel which is close-hauled on the port tack shall keep out of the way of a vessel which is close-hauled on the starboard tack.
Page 241 - ... points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on...
Page 254 - When two steam vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision, each shall alter her course to starboard, so that each may pass on the port side of the other. This article only applies to cases where vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on. in such a manner as to involve risk of collision...
Page 40 - In every case of collision between two vessels it shall be the duty of the master or person in charge of each vessel, if and so far as he can do so without serious danger to his own vessel, crew, and passengers...
Page 53 - Every vessel coming up with another vessel from any direction more than two points abaft her beam, that is, in such a position, with reference to the vessel which she is overtaking that at night she would be unable to see either of that vessel's side-lights, shall be deemed to be an overtaking vessel...
Page 254 - Risk of collision can, when circumstances permit, be ascertained by carefully watching the compass bearing of an approaching vessel. If the bearing does not appreciably change, such risk should be deemed to exist.
Page 27 - A vessel under one hundred and fifty feet in length, when at anchor, shall carry forward, where it can best be seen, but at a height not exceeding twenty feet above the hull, a white light in a lantern so constructed as to show a clear, uniform, and unbroken light visible all around the horizon at a distance of at least one mile.
Page 260 - That the following regulations for preventing collisions at sea shall be followed by all public and private vessels of the United States upon the high seas and in all waters connected therewith, navigable by seagoing vessels.

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