Andrew Jackson and Early Tennessee History ...

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Ambrose Printing Company, 1921 - Tennessee
 

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Page 678 - Lo, this only have I found, that God hath made man upright; but they have sought out many inventions.
Page 211 - If there be those who would not save the Union unless they could at the same time save slavery, I do not agree with them. If there be those who would not save the Union unless they could at the same time destroy slavery, I do not agree with them. My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it ; and if I could...
Page 690 - With such powerful and obvious motives to union affecting all parts of our country, while experience shall not have demonstrated its impracticability there will always be reason to distrust the patriotism of those who, in any quarter, may endeavor to weaken its bands.
Page 311 - Union to your collective and individual happiness ; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity ; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can, in any event, be abandoned...
Page 360 - Then said Paul unto him, God shall smite thee, thou whited wall ; for sittest thou to judge me after the law, and commandest me to be smitten contrary to the law?
Page 228 - Then went out to him Jerusalem, and all Judea, and all the region round about Jordan, And were baptized of him in Jordan, confessing their sins.
Page 306 - In the full enjoyment of the gifts of Heaven and the fruits of superior industry, economy, and virtue, every man is equally entitled to protection by law; but when the laws undertake to add to these natural and just advantages artificial distinctions, to grant titles, gratuities, and exclusive privileges, to make the rich richer and the potent more powerful...
Page 300 - The opinion of the judges has no more authority over Congress, than the opinion of (Congress has over the judges; and, on that point, the President is independent of both.
Page 428 - Resolved, That the President, in the late Executive proceedings in relation to the public revenue, has assumed upon himself authority and power not conferred by the Constitution and laws, but in derogation of both.
Page 226 - The struggling pangs of conscious truth to hide, To quench the blushes of ingenuous shame, Or heap the shrine of luxury and pride With incense kindled at the Muse's flame.

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