"There are No Slaves in France": The Political Culture of Race and Slavery in the Ancien Régime

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1996 - History - 210 pages
1 Review
There Are No Slaves in France examines the paradoxical emergence of political antislavery and institutional racism in the century prior to the French Revolution. Sue Peabody shows how the political culture of late Bourbon France created ample opportunities for contestation over the meaning of freedom. Based on various archival sources, this work will be of interest not only to historians of slavery and France, but to scholars interested in the emergence of modern culture in the Atlantic world.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Not enough well-written and researched books on 18th century slavery in France out there. This defiantly makes any historians book shelf if their concentration is France, colonization, slavery, or any philosophical shifts in history. Very Well done!!!

Contents

Slavery in France The Problem and Early Responses
11
The Case of Jean Boucaux v Verdelin Fashioning the National Myth of Liberty
23
The Impact of the Declaration of 1738 Nantes La Rochelle and Paris
41
Notions of Race in the Eighteenth Century
57
Crisis Blacks in the Capital 1762
72
Antislavery and Antidespotism 17601771
88
The Police des Noirs 17761777
106
Erosion of the Police des Noirs
121
Epilogue
137
Notes
141
Bibliography
189
Index
201
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - England, he could still be held to be "owned" by his master. Arguing that he could not, counsel for the defence, referring to an earlier judgment given in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, said: .... it was resolved that England was too pure an air for slaves to breathe in...

References to this book

Anti-racism
Alastair Bonnett
No preview available - 2000
All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

Sue Peabody is at Washington State University.

Bibliographic information