Murdering to Dissect: Grave-robbing, Frankenstein and the Anatomy Literature

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Manchester University Press, 1995 - Literary Criticism - 354 pages
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When Frankenstein appeared in 1818 it was well known that the medical profession lent silent support to the grave-robbing gangs who regulary sold the surgeons newly-buried bodies for dissection. This resurection trade led to the sensational Burke and Hare case, which revealed that the bodies of murder victims had been pased to the Edinburgh surgeon Dr Robert Knox with his connivance.
 

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Contents

The dead body business
19
The contented executioner in Bamaby Rudge
38
Multiaccentuation in On Murder considered as one
44
3
63
Trading
74
Aesthetics and murder
83
4
91
Claiming
97
From crowd to social class
238
Clerval
251
Disease deformity and dissection
260
The graveyard
270
Laughter
282
The hare
290
The ShipofState
296
England 183132
303

The coach scene in Oliver Twist and Frankenstein
106
5
129
6
160
Frankenstein and the resurrectionist culture 17961825
177
The political allegory
230
Conclusion
329
Select bibliography
340
Index
347
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