The Works of Samuel Johnson...

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H. C. Carey & I. Lea, 1825 - English literature
 

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Page 248 - heave her head, The tuneful voice was heard from high, And music's power obey. From harmony from heavenly harmony, From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, This universal frame began: The diapason closing full in man. The conclusion is likewise striking; but it includes an image so awful
Page 290 - whom I hoped to have gratified with this character of our common friend; but what are the hopes of man! I am disappointed by that stroke of death which has eclipsed the gaiety of nations and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure. In the library at Oxford is the following ludicrous Analysis
Page 248 - So, when the last and dreadful hour This crumbling pageant shall devour The trumpet shall be heard on high, The dead shall live, the living die, And music shall untune the sky. Of his skill in elegy he has given a specimen in his
Page 22 - To move, but doth if th' other do. And though it in the centre sit, And grows erect as that comes home. Such wilt thou be to me, who must, Like the other foot obliquely run. Thy firmness makes my circle just, And makes me end where I begun.
Page 51 - He went to the university with a design of entering into the church, but in time altered his mind; for he declared that whoever became a clergyman must " subscribe slave, and take an oath withal, which, unless he took with a conscience that could not retch, he must straight perjure himself.
Page 248 - itself, that it can owe little to poetry; and I could wish the antithesis of music untuning had found some other place. The spheres began to move, And sung the great Creator's praise To all the bless'd above: As from the power of sacred lays
Page 516 - afflictions from which the abilities of Savage did not exempt him ; or those, who, in confidence of superior capacities or attainments, disregard the common maxims of life, shall be reminded, that nothing will supply the want of prudence; and that negligence and irregularity, long continued, will make knowledge useless, wit ridiculous, and genius contemptible.
Page 53 - which," says he, " I take to be my portion in this life, joined with a strong propensity of nature," he might " leave something so written to after-times, as they should not willingly let it die.
Page 44 - Should such a man too fond to rule alone, Bear, like the Turk, no brother near the throne. But this is not the best of his little pieces: it is excelled by his poem
Page 203 - (Such as disquiet always what is well, And by ill-imitating would excel,) Might hence presume the whole creation's day To change in scenes, and show it in a play." It is another of his hasty productions; for the heat of his imagination raised it in a month. This composition is addressed to the princess of

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