On the Edge of Empire: Hadhramawt, Emigration, and the Indian Ocean, 1880s-1930s

Front Cover
SUNY Press, May 2, 2002 - History - 292 pages
0 Reviews
Offering a new perspective on a little-studied society, On the Edge of Empire examines the gradual incorporation of the Qu`ayti and Kathiri sultanates of Hadhramawt in the southern Arabian Peninsula into the British Empire during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Boxberger shows how changes in political and social institutions fostered contestation at all levels, from rivalries over territory and political power, to heated debates over religious and educational reform, to efforts to regulate wedding customs and women's dress. Based on extensive fieldwork, this ethnographic and historical narrative draws upon a wide variety of sources, including British documents and accounts; local documents, manuscripts and rare printed materials; extensive interviews with Hadhrami elders from all walks of life; and proverbs, poetry, and tribal lore. Clearly written and richly textured, this book is a welcome contribution to the study of Yemen, the historical ethnography of the Middle East, and the literature on the Islamic societies of the Indian Ocean littoral.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Identity in Hadhrami Society
11
Hadhrami Emigration and the Mahjar
39
Urban and Rural Life in the Interior
67
Urban and Rural Life on the Coast and Its Hinterland
97
Rites of Passage Ceremonies and Social Critique
123
Religious Belief Practice and Education Tradition Revival and Critique
149
The Two Sultanates Rivals from Inception to Union 1880s to 1918
183
The Sultanates Challengers and Reformers 1918 to 1936
211
CONCLUSION
241
Rulers of Hadhramawt Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries
247
QuaytiKathiri Agreement of 1918 the Aden Agreement
249
NOTES
253
English and European Languages
277
Arabic Language
283
INDEX
287
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Linda Boxberger is an independent scholar, with extensive experience teaching and conducting research in Yemen. She received her Ph.D. in history from The University of Texas at Austin.

Bibliographic information