Narrative of Joanna, an Emancipated Slave of Surinam: From Stedman's Narrative of a Five Year's Expedition Against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam

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I. Knapp, 1838 - Blacks - 64 pages
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Page 17 - Silent the warrior smiled, and pleased resign'd To tender passions all his mighty mind; His beauteous princess cast a mournful look, Hung on his hand, and then dejected spoke; Her bosom labour'd with a boding sigh, And the big tear stood trembling in her eye.
Page 5 - Her face was full of native modesty, and the most distinguished sweetness; her eyes, as black as ebony, were large and full of expression, bespeaking the goodness of her heart; with cheeks through which glowed, in spite of the darkness of her complexion, a beautiful tinge of vermillion, when gazed upon. Her nose was perfectly well formed, rather small; her lips a little prominent, which, when she spoke, discovered two regular rows of...
Page 28 - His malice, and with rapine sweet bereaved His fierceness of the fierce intent it brought. That space the Evil One abstracted stood From his own evil, and for the time remained Stupidly good ; of enmity disarmed, Of guile, of hate, of envy, of revenge.
Page 7 - ... (Her face was full of native modesty, and the most distinguished sweetness. Her eyes as black as ebony, were large and full of expression, bespeaking the goodness of her heart, with cheeks through which glowed, in spite of the darkness of her complexion, a beautiful tinge of vermillion, when gazed upon. (Her nose was perfectly well formed, rather small, her lips a little prominent...
Page 17 - ... my recovery from sickness; and at the same time, however strange it may appear to many readers, they, with a smile, wished me joy of what, with their usual good humour, they were pleased to call my conquest; which, one of the ladies in company assured me, while it was perhaps censured by some, was applauded by many, but she believed in her heart envied by all.
Page 10 - ... a state of sadness and stupefaction. However trifling, and like the style of romance, this relation may appear to some, it is nevertheless a genuine account, and on that score I flatter myself may not entirely be uninteresting to others. When reflecting on the state of slavery altogether, while my ears were stunned with the clang of the whip and the dismal yells of the wretched negroes on whom it was exercised from morning till night, and considering that this might one day be the fate of the...
Page 22 - Fhoceus think it shame -*— * For a fair slave to own his flame; A slave could stern Achilles move, And bend his haughty soul to love: Ajax, invincible in arms, Was captiv'd by his captive's charms : Atrides 'midst his triumphs mourn'd, And for a ravish'd virgin burn'd, What time the fierce barbarian bands Fell by Pelides...

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