The British flower garden. The drawings by E.D. Smith

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1835
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Page 151 - ... examine being very incomplete, several errors have unavoidably crept into my former description of the genus, which are now corrected. The genus was named by Cavanilles after Don Francisco Franco, a Physician of Valentía, who flourished at the commencement of the sixteenth century. He was author of several medical works, and an ardent cultivator and promoter of the science of Botany. The Francoa sonchifolia is the second species of Molina's genus Panke, the other being Gunnera scabra, from which...
Page 238 - Раэопу, has been rewarded by the production of several splendid varieties far excelling any of those imported from China, was so fortunate also as to raise the present fine variety, which is remarkable for its dwarf and almost herbaceous habit.
Page 176 - ... G. pudibundus (Blush-flowered Corn Flag) was figured by Sweet (183235), and described by him as follows: This is a hybrid, we believe, between Gladiolus cardinalis and blandus and was raised by the Honorable and Reverend William Herbert to whom we are obliged for the specimen figured in the plate. Stem from two to three feet high, straight, cylindrical, smooth. Leaves broadly ensiform, acuminate, ribbed, of a pale green. Flowers large, of a brillant rose color, about ten in number, distantly...
Page 104 - Caspar Wistar, MD, late professor of Anatomy in the University of Pennsylvania, and for many years president of the American Philosophical Society...
Page 253 - The species was originally collected by Dr. F. HAMILToN, at Chitlong, in the Valley of Nepal, flowering in April, and it appears to be a pretty general plant on the mountains, at an elevation of from 5,000 to 7,000 feet above the level of the sea. The plant proves to be quite hardy, and seems to flourish as well in the climate of England as on its native mountains. The flowers are very like those of the Anemone sylveslris (Wood Anemone).
Page 238 - A low-growing bushy kind, branching from the ground, and scarcely woody. Flowers about 6 in. across. Petals white, stained with a deep rose colour in various parts; the base marked with numerous radiating streaks of violet and purple. Anthers yellow. The Earl of Mountnorris, whose successful culture of the tree...
Page 247 - Viola ranunculifolia with a slight degree of doubt, merely because it is described as glabrous, which this is not on the surface of the leaves. The plant is extremely beautiful, and highly deserving of cultivation in the open border. It was introduced by Mr. Drummond from Georgia into the Botanic Garden, Glasgow, from whence...
Page 272 - The rest of the plants began to blossom soon after, and all apparently varying in the degree of intensity in colour. In cultivation the plant rarely exceeds four or five feet in height, and evidently possesses a hardier constitution than arborea.
Page 251 - Not surpassed in beauty by C. Medium, which it resembles in habit, and by several botanists it has even been regarded as the normal state of that species. It occurs wild in Hungary, Transylvania, the Bannat of Temeswar, and also in Siberia. It was first taken up by Willdenow in his enumeration of the plants cultivated in the Royal Gardens at Berlin, and is principally distinguished from C. sibirica by its more branching habit, less wavy leaves, and larger flowers. Our drawing was taken from a very...
Page 281 - ... introduced by Professor Reinwardt, of Leyden, who has liberally distributed bulbs of it to various collections both in this country and on the Continent. It is by far the largest in growth, and in beauty of its flowers it is not surpassed by any others of the genus. The plant seems to be quite as hardy as G. byzantinus and requires the same soil and treatment as that species.

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