Parry's Monthly Magazine, Volume 3

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Page 324 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 279 - The longer I live, the more I am certain that the great difference between men, between the feeble and the powerful, the great and the insignificant, is energy — invincible determination ; a purpose once fixed and then death or victory. That quality will do anything that can be done in this world, and no talents, no circumstances, no opportunities, will make a two-legged creature a man without it.
Page 194 - The paths of glory lead but to the grave " — must have seemed at such a moment fraught with mournful meaning. At the close of the recitation Wolfe added, "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.
Page 276 - WE were crowded in the cabin, Not a soul would dare to sleep, — It was midnight on the waters, And a storm was on the deep. 'Tis a fearful thing in winter To be shattered by the blast, And to hear the rattling trumpet Thunder, "Cut away the mast!
Page 298 - We regard the state as an agency whose positive assistance is one of the indispensable conditions of human progress.
Page 79 - If a man spends lavishly on his library, you call him mad— a bibliomaniac. But you never call any one a horsemaniac, though men ruin themselves every day by their horses, and you do not hear of people ruining themselves by their books.
Page 372 - Oh make Thou us, through centuries long, In peace secure, in justice strong ; Around our gift of freedom draw The safeguards of thy righteous law : And, cast in some diviner mould, Let the new cycle shame the old...
Page 79 - ... provision for life, and for the best part of us; yet how long most people would look at the best book before they would give the price of a large turbot for it! Though there have been men who. have pinched their stomachs and bared their backs to buy a book, whose libraries were cheaper to them, I think, in the end, than most men's dinners are.
Page 369 - Oh for festal dainties spread, Like my bowl of milk and bread; Pewter spoon and bowl of wood, On the door-stone, gray and rude! O'er me, like a regal tent, Cloudy-ribbed, the sunset bent, Purple-curtained, fringed with gold, Looped in many a wind swung fold; While for music came the play Of the pied frogs' orchestra; And, to light the noisy choir, Lit the fly his lamp of fire.
Page 3 - But an ingenious reader will learn, also, that a certain number of books were written by a supremely noble kind of people — not a very great number of books, but still a number fit to occupy all your reading industry, do adhere more or less to that side of things.

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