Fugitive pieces, on various subjects, Volume 2

Front Cover
Robert Dodsley
Printed for R. and J. Dodsley, 1761
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Page 273 - ... next came the Queen, in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic; her face oblong, fair but wrinkled; her eyes small, yet black and pleasant, her nose a little hooked; her lips narrow, and her teeth black (a defect the English seem subject to, from their too great use of sugar...
Page 275 - ... kneeled, as the others had done, and placed what was brought upon the table, they too retired with the same ceremonies performed by the first. At last came an unmarried lady (we...
Page 276 - The queen dines and sups alone with very few attendants ; and it is very seldom that any body, foreigner or native, is admitted at that time, and then only at the intercession of somebody in power.
Page 151 - Weep, thou father of Morar! weep; but thy son heareth thee not. Deep is the sleep of the dead; low their pillow of dust. No more shall he hear thy voice; no more awake at thy call.
Page 276 - At the end of this ceremonial, a number of unmarried ladies appeared, who, with particular solemnity, lifted the meat off the table, and conveyed it into the Queen's inner and more private chamber, where, after she had chosen for herself, the rest goes to the Ladies of the Court.
Page 67 - I suppose that there are in Great Britain upwards of an hundred thousand people employed in lead, tin, iron, copper, and coal mines ; these unhappy wretches scarce ever see the light of the sun ; they are buried in the bowels of the earth ; there they work at a severe and dismal task, without the least prospect of being delivered from it ; they subsist upon the coarsest and worst sort of fare ; they have their health miserably impaired, and their lives cut short, by being perpetually confined in...
Page 269 - ... tired. To this entertainment there often follows that of whipping a blinded bear, which is performed by five or six men, standing circularly with whips, which they exercise upon him without any mercy, as he cannot escape from them because of his chain; he defends himself with all his force and skill, throwing down all who come within his reach, and are not active enough to get out of it ; on which occasions he frequently tears the whips out of their hands, and breaks them. At these spectacles,...
Page 139 - She fell; she trembled; and died. By the brook of the hill their graves are laid; a birch's unequal shade covers their tomb. Often on their green earthen tombs the branchy sons of the mountain feed, when mid-day is all in flames, and silence is over all the hills.
Page 270 - At these spectacles, and everywhere else, the English are constantly smoaking tobacco, and in this manner: they have pipes on purpose made of clay, into the farther end of which they put the Herb, so dry that it may be rubbed into powder, and putting fire to it, they draw the smoke into their mouths, which they puff out again, through their nostrils, like funnels, along with it plenty of phlegm and defluxion from the head.
Page 149 - RYNO The wind and the rain are past: calm is the noon of day. The clouds are divided in heaven. Over the green hills flies the inconstant sun.

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