Socialism as a moral movement, Volume 9

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Page 10 - has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other...
Page 8 - They saw that with every great moral progress of man, with every great conquest of the spirit of association and love in history, there corresponded, sooner or later, a material amelioration, an augmentation of comfort ; and from this providential fact — which is but one of the means of verifying human progress, and which, I repeat, is almost always realised when the immediate agent has disappeared — they concluded that we have only to make of this fact the basis and the object of life. They...
Page 21 - Instead of saying all through the people, it contented itself with saying all for the people. Having imagined a certain form for the realisation of the principle, it ended by confounding that form with the principle itself, and pretended to force humanity into that form as into a frame. It took society in its arms, if the expression may be allowed, and endeavoured to transform it by transporting it into another medium, elaborated, not by society itself, but by the system. It is the error of all socialists....
Page 21 - ... and pretended to force humanity into that form as into a frame. It took society in its arms, if the expression may be allowed, and endeavoured to transform it by transporting it into another medium, elaborated, not by society itself, but by the system. It is the error of all socialists. They forget that we are here below to continue humanity and not to create it ; and humanity, which desires to walk on its own legs, and with full knowledge of all it does, avenges itself by passing on and withdrawing...
Page 11 - Laissez faire, laissez passer; is the formula of the school. This is not the ideal we seek ; no, certainly, it was not to attain the ignoble and immoral every one for himself, that so many great men, holy martyrs of thought, have shed, from epoch to epoch, from century to century, the tears of the...
Page 8 - ... progress of man, with every great conquest of the spirit of association and love in history, there corresponded, sooner or later, a material amelioration, an augmentation of comfort ; and from this providential fact — which is but one of the means of verifying human progress, and which, I repeat, is almost always realised when the immediate agent has disappeared — they concluded that we have only to make of this fact the basis and the object of life. They began the problem at the end, and...
Page 6 - We have torn the great and beautiful ensign of democracy : the progress of all through all, under the leading of the best and wisest.
Page 8 - ... this fact the basis and the object of life. They began the problem at the end, and attempted to poise the pyramid on its apex. Their conduct somewhat resembles that of the child, who maintained that the two expressions — to eat to live, and to live to eat — were identical. How did they fail to see that, by substituting the fact for the principle, they deprived themselves of what alone can produce the fact...
Page 23 - Man is a producing being," says the economist, and he proposes to himself, as the unique, exclusive problem, the augmentation of production ; let the agent die under his labour, provided the thing is made. " Man," cries the socialist, " is a being who consumes," and he busies himself only with the distribution of riches. To arrive more speedily at absolute equality, he takes away all that stimulates man to increase more and more the common fund ; without suspecting that he incurs the risk of arriving...
Page 7 - to have lost favour, chiefly owing to moral considerations, to the assertion of the claims of other than material interests, and to a growing feeling that it is right deliberately to risk commercial and industrial advantages for the sake of reforming social abuses, and securing social benefits. Professor Eogers, in his late able address on " Some sides of Laissez-faire...

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