The Horticulturist, and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste, Volumes 19-21

Front Cover
Luther Tucker, 1864 - Gardening
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Page 39 - green. As with a rural mound, the champaigne head Of a steep wilderness, whose hairy sides With thicket over-grown, grotesque and wild. Access denied ; and overhead up grew Insuperable height of loftiest shade, Cedar, and Pine, and Fir, and branching Palm, A sylvan scene,
Page 283 - in all its functions for the perpetual comfort and exalting of the heart— for soothing it and purifying it of its dross and dust. Sometimes gentle, sometimes capricious, sometimes awful, never the same for two moments together, almost human in its passions, almost spiritual in its tenderness, almost divine in its
Page 284 - be sought ere it can be seen, and loved ere it is understood ; things which the angels work out for us daily, and yet vary eternally, which are never wanting, and never repeated ; which are to be found always yet each found but once ; it is through these that her
Page 32 - I might be master, at least of a small house and large garden, with very moderate conveniences joined to them, and there dedicate the remainder of my life only to the culture of them and the study of nature. And there, with no design beyond my wall Whole and
Page 283 - accident», too common and too vain to be worthy of a moment of watchfulness, or a glance of admiration. If in our moments of utter idleness and insipidity wo turn to the sky as a la»t resource, which of its phenomena do we speak of
Page 284 - of the hail, nor the drift of the whirlwind, that the highest characters of the sublime are developed. God is not in the earthquake, nor in the fire, but in the still small voice.
Page 283 - One says it has been wet ; and another it has been windy ; and another it has been warm. Who, among the whole chattering crowd, can tell me of the forms and the precipices of the chain of tall white
Page 227 - in each flower, A story in each stream and bower ; In every herb on which you tread, Are written words, which, rightly read, Will lead you from earth's fragrant sod, To hope, and holiness, and God." Indeed, the occupation that is to be found in
Page 168 - And they came unto the brook of Eschol, "and cut down from thence a branch with "one cluster of grapes, and they bore it " between two upon a staff.
Page 283 - its dross and dust. Sometimes gentle, sometimes capricious, sometimes awful, never the same for two moments together, almost human in its passions, almost spiritual in its tenderness, almost divine in its affinity;

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