Mathurini Corderii colloquia selecta, an Engl. tr. by S. Loggon. 21st ed., corrected

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Popular passages

Page 88 - But he does not use to go out, but with the good leave of the master. But he deceives the master. How does he deceive him? For it is not the mind of the master^ that Ae should go out three limes every day.
Page 69 - M the tradesman said : see the mark. I do not know, but you do not act wisely enough, who trust any tradesman.
Page 82 - You do a? becomes a friend, but we will talk together tomorrow in more words. See the master, who now enters the school. Let us go to hear the lesson.
Page iv - ... been diligent in getting his lesson, or has been idle, the English construing being before his eyes while he is saying the lesson to the master. To which I shall add (Loggon himself with considerable naivete observes) that my experience shews us that little boys have artful cunning enough to cheat themselves and their master, when they have so fair an opportunity to do it.
Page 79 - He admonished me in many words that I should study diligently. I wish you would do so. I will do IT, God helping. Has he given you money?
Page 114 - Cato,yor you know /was sick almost two weeks. I remember; will you then that we say the second book of moral distiches?
Page iv - The method in Clarke's book is to place a rather free translation in a column by the side of the text in each page. To this Loggon objects that ' ' as the Latin and English are both in one page, I think they (that is, Clarke's books generally, for he had published
Page iv - ... Clarke's book is to place a rather free translation in a column by the side of the text in each page. To this Loggon objects that ' ' as the Latin and English are both in one page, I think they (that is, Clarke's books generally, for he had published ' Suetonius' and other authors in a similar way) are not proper for schools ; nay, almost as improper as if published with interlinear versions, which method of printing books for schools Mr. Clarke himself objects against. Where the English and...
Page 76 - God has not been offended here. Well, I will conceal it. You will do well. But Aari you, remember to return like for like.
Page iv - ... text in each page. To this Loggon objects that ' ' as the Latin and English are both in one page, I think they (that is, Clarke's books generally, for he had published ' Suetonius' and other authors in a similar way) are not proper for schools ; nay, almost as improper as if published with interlinear versions, which method of printing books for schools Mr. Clarke himself objects against. Where the English and Latin are both on the same page (one remarks, whom Loggon quotes), it cannot be well...

Bibliographic information