The Midland florist and suburban horticulturist, conducted by J.F. Wood

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John Frederick Wood
1862
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Page 33 - And Reuben went in the days of wheat harvest, and found mandrakes in the field, and brought them unto his mother Leah. Then Rachel said to Leah, Give me, I pray thee, of thy son's mandrakes.
Page 83 - And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength. This is the first commandment. And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these.
Page 108 - This brawl to-day, Grown to this faction, in the Temple garden, Shall send, between the red rose and the white, A thousand souls to death and deadly night.
Page 151 - Among his anecdotes of celebrated English oaks, we were surprised to find Mr. Loudon adopting (at least so we understand him) an apocryphal story about Herne's Oak, given in the lively pages of Mr. Jesse's Gleanings. That gentleman, if he had taken any trouble, might have ascertained that the tree in question was cut down one morning, by order of King George III., when in a state of great, but transient, excitement; the circumstance caused much regret and astonishment at the time, and was commented...
Page 150 - I commit ft to your especial charge ; and take care that no damage is ever done to it. I had rather that every tree in the park should be cut down, than that this tree should be hurt. This i$ Berne's Oak.
Page 105 - ... cultivated, or several removes from a wild state, though still a mazzard, the seedlings will show great variety of character. Once in the possession of a variety, which has moved out of the natural into a more domesticated form, we have in our hands the best material for the improving process. The fixed original habit of the species is broken in upon, and this variety which we have created, has always afterwards some tendency to make further departures from the original form.
Page 71 - Your long life spent in the most arduous studies, your unwearied application to improve mankind as well as your own country, very deservedly entitle you to the high honours so lately conferred on you. May you live long to enjoy them, with health of body and tranquillity of mind, is the ardent sincere wish of your affectionate friend, P. COLLINSON. PS It is now five years since my good friend told...
Page 151 - Herne the Hunter having blasted it, it appears to have suffered a premature decay within the last twenty years. This tree is of small girth compared with other trees about it. It is not more than fifteen feet in ciroumference at the largest part, while there is a magnificent oak at about two hundred yards distance, whose girth is nearly thirty feet.
Page 33 - I had not the pleasure," he says, " to see this plant in blossom, the fruit now hanging ripe to the stem, which lay withered on the ground; but I got several roots, which I found difficult to procure entire, as the inhabitants had no spades, but a kind of hoe, or ground axe; with this they cut up the earth, and hurt the root, which, in some plants, descended six and eight feet under ground.
Page 150 - Oak to be cut down. I have also the authority of one of the members of the present Royal Family for stating, that George III. always mentioned the tree now standing as Herne's Oak. King William III. was a great planter of avenues, and to him we are indebted for those in Hampton Court and Bushy Parks, and also those at Windsor. All these have been made in a straight line, with the exception of one in the Home Park, which diverges a little, so as to take in Herne's Oak as a part of the avenue — a...

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