"Story of the Galveston flood."

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R. H. Woodward company, 1900 - Galveston (Tex.) - 366 pages
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Page 51 - ... the God of the Jews. The Sermon on the Mount, we have been told in effect, was merely a string of amiable metaphors. The real Jesus Whom we are to treat as our Master was the one Who used the scourge of small cords in the Temple, not the one who bade us turn the other cheek. When He said, " Greater love hath no man than this, that he give his life for his friend," what He meant was that we are to kill our enemies.
Page 96 - ... man was big and muscular, one of the women was old and one was young. They were dipping in a heap of rubbish, and when they heard my footsteps the man turned an evil, glowering face upon me and the young woman hid something in the folds of her dress. Human ghouls, these, prowling in search of prey. narrow street, and I looked back and saw the negro running, with a crowd at his heels. The crowd caught him and would have killed him but a policeman came up. They tied his hands and took him through...
Page 48 - ... over the island. Men who had delayed starting for home, hoping for an abatement of the storm, concluded that the storm had grown worse and went out in that howling, raging, furious storm, wading through water almost to their necks, dodging flying missiles swept by a wind blowing 100 miles an hour. building could withstand them and none wholly escaped injury. Others were picked up at sea. And all during the terrible storm acts of the greatest heroism were performed. Hundreds and hundreds of brave...
Page 51 - The most intense and anxious time was between 8.30 and 9 o'clock, with raging seas rolling around them, with a wind so terrific that none could hope to escape its fury, with roofs...
Page 47 - ... that try men's souls and sicken their hearts. The storm at sea is terrible, but there are no such dreadful consequences as those which have followed the storm on the sea coast and it is men who passed through the terrors of the storm, who faced death for hours, men ruined in property and bereft of families, who took up the herculean and well-nigh impossible task of bringing order out of chaos, of caring for the living and disposing of the dead before they made life impossible here. The storm...
Page 86 - We sat on the deck of the little steamer. The four men from out-of-town cities and I listened to the little boat's wheel plowing its way through the calm waters of the bay. The stars shone down like a benediction, but along the line of the shore there rose a great leaping column of blood-red flame. "What a terrible fire !" I said. "Some of the large buildings must be burning.
Page 127 - Washington, September 10. — Hon. JD Sayers, Governor of Texas, Austin, Texas : The reports of the great calamity which has befallen Galveston and other points on the coast of Texas excite my profound sympathy for the sufferers, as they will stir! the hearts of the whole country. Whatever help it is possible to give shall be gladly extended. Have directed the Secretary of War to supply rations and tents upon your request. A copy of this telegram was sent to the Mayor of Galveston as well as to Governor...
Page 78 - Houses are packed and jammed in great confusing masses in all of the streets. Great piles of human bodies, dead animals, rotting vegetation, household furniture and fragments of the houses themselves are piled in confused heaps right in the main streets of the city. Along the Gulf front human bodies are floating around like cordwood.
Page 87 - The man laughed again and began again to walk up and down the deck. "That's right," said the US Marshal of Southern Texas, taking off his broad hat and letting the starlight shine on his strong face, "that's right. We've had to do it. We've burned over 1,000 people to-day, and to-morrow we shall burn as many more. "Yesterday we stopped burying the bodies at sea; we had to give the men on the barges whiskey to give them courage to do their work. They carried out hundreds of the dead at one time, men...
Page 94 - ... and talked with women who saw every one they loved on earth swept away from them out in the storm. As I look out of my window I can see the blood-red flame leaping with fantastic gesture against the sky. There is no wire into Galveston, and I will have to send this message out by the first boat. " For the present the two things needed are money and disinfectants. More nurses and doctors are needed. Galveston wants help — quick, ready, willing help. Don't waste a minute to send it. If it does...

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