The illuminated ladies' book of useful and ornamental needlework

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Thomas Brooks, 8 Baker Street, Portman Square, 1844 - Crocheting - 174 pages
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Page 179 - The Psalms of David, with the Scripture paraphrases, according to the version of the Established Church of Scotland, SfC., by J.
Page 137 - Work, has been brought to such a high state of perfection — the works written upon the subject so numerous— the Variety of patterns so great, and so well adapted to every purpose to which it can be applied — that we do not hope here to be able to throw much new light upon the subject.
Page 137 - Embroidery, or as it is more often called Berlin wool work, has been brought to such a high state of perfection ... the variety of patterns so great, and so well adapted to every purpose to which it can be applied ... that we do not hope here to be able to throw much new light on the subject'.
Page 31 - To make a stitch — at the commencement and end of a row, is to make one stitch of a chain before the first stitch, and after the last, which in the next row are to be crocheted. A dividing, or seam stitch — called also a raised stitch, is made by putting the needle through both meshes of the chain, and working two stitches in the same hole. These stitches must always be made exactly over each other. In crocheting circles, they form a kind of star pattern, and serve the purpose of increasing stitches....
Page 27 - Open crochet — is worked (as nearly as can be described) as follows : — make a chain of the length required ; work one plain stitch at the beginning. Bring the silk round the needle, and pass the needle through the first loop of the chain ; through this bring the silk, which makes three stitches on the needle ; draw the silk through the two first stitches, which leaves two on the needle ; then draw the silk through these two, which leaves one on the needle; through this one, make one plain stitch....
Page 12 - The silk is to be twisted round the fingers as in plain netting, and the needle must pass through the finger loop into the first stitch, and thence into the second. Then let the second be drawn through the first, and the first through the second, finishing the stitch by releasing your fingers, and pulling the material tight. The succeeding stitch is a small loop, that appears to cross the stitches twisted together. These three kinds of stitches form the pattern, and are to be repeated until the work...
Page 66 - In the next row (in order to keep the circle flat) every other stitch is to be made a seam or dividing stitch, which is done by putting the needle under both loops, instead of one, and making two stitches in the same place, every other stitch being a plain stitch. In the next row, work the seamstitch in the same place, leaving two plain stitches between each, instead of one. Repeat this circle sixteen times, always observing to keep the seam-stitch in the same place, the number of plain stitches...
Page 30 - ... the stitch you are about to work, you can draw the thread through the back, and make the finishing loop in the common way: you will then find that the bead is on the right side. EDGE STITCH. — To work this stitch you are to draw a loop through the first stitch on the row, or on the round, if you work in rounds, then draw a second loop through the one last made. Thus the edge stitch is formed. It is of importance to attend to the regular working of this stitch, because if it is not done, you...
Page 12 - ... as in plain netting, and the needle must pass through the finger loop into the first stitch, and thence into the second. Then let the second be drawn through the first, and the first through the second, finishing the stitch by releasing your fingers, and pulling the material tight. The succeeding stitch is a small loop, that appears to cross the stitches twisted together. These three kinds of stitches form the pattern, and are to be repeated until the work is completed. Grecian netting may be...
Page 73 - The whole of the purse is to be continued in the same manner, but it may be varied, according to taste, by using two or more colours. When the purse is worked to the size desired, cut a piece of stiff cardboard, and sew the purse firmly to it, — the wrong side outwards; damp it with a little water...

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