Technology Assessment: Protecting Structures and Improving Communications During Wild Land Fires

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DIANE Publishing, 2005 - 114 pages
Since 1984, wildland fires have burned 850+ homes each year & the number of homes at risk is growing. The primary responsibility for ensuring that preventive steps are taken to protect homes lies with homeowners & state & local gov'ts., not the fed. gov't. The ability to communicate among all parties fighting a fire -- known as interoperability -- is essential, but is hampered because different public safety agencies operate on different radio frequencies or use incompatible communications equip. This report assesses: measures that can help protect structures from wildland fires, factors affecting use of protective measures, & the role technology plays in improving firefighting agencies' ability to communicate during wildland fires. Charts & tables.
 

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Page 1 - We also will make copies available to others upon request. In addition, the report will be available at no charge on the GAO Web site at http://www.gao.gov. If you or your staff have any questions about this report, please contact me at (202) 512-4128 or fordj@gao.gov.
Page 36 - ... enforce their activities. Tax incentives are the result of special exclusions, exemptions, deductions, credits, deferrals, or tax rates in the federal tax laws. Unlike grants, tax incentives do not generally permit the same degree of federal oversight and targeting, and they are generally available by formula to all potential beneficiaries who satisfy congressionally established criteria.
Page 52 - SEC. 417. The President is authorized to provide assistance, including grants, equipment, supplies, and personnel, to any State for the suppression of any fire on publicly or privately owned forest or grassland which threatens such destruction as would constitute a major disaster.
Page 15 - Agency Comments and Our Evaluation We provided copies of our draft report to the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Energy, Homeland Security, and the Interior; the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the Environmental Protection Agency. The Department of the Interior concurred with our findings and...
Page 54 - Ictnaiiry (potential use of lethal force by or against DoD forces): risk (safety of DoD forces); cost (who pays, impact on...
Page 52 - The situation is of such severity and magnitude that effective response is beyond the capabilities of the State and affected local governments; and...
Page 42 - Homeland Security: Challenges in Achieving Interoperable Communications for First Responders, GAO-04-231T (Washington, DC: Nov.
Page 20 - Selections From The US Fire Problem Overview Report, Leading Causes and Other Patterns and Trends, Homes, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA, April, 2000.
Page 86 - ... an on-going process and mechanism to measure the state of interoperability on a recurring basis, and develop an interoperability baseline self-assessment tool for local and state public safety agencies. SAFECOM anticipates that it wl complete the National lnteroperabSty Baseline by December 30.
Page 15 - Project SAFECOM: Key Cross-Agency Emergency Communications Effort Requires Stronger Collaboration, GAO-04-494 (Washington, DC: Apr.

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