Serious Remonstrances: Addressed to the Citizens of the Northern States, and Their Representatives: Being an Appeal to Their Natural Feelings & Common Sense: Consisting of Speculations and Animadversions, on the Recent Revival of the Slave Trade, in the American Republic: with an Investigation Relative to the Consequent Evils Resulting from that Event. Interspersed with a Simplified Plan for Colonizing the Free Negroes of the Northern, in Conjunction with Those who Have, Or May Emigrate from the Southern States, in a Distant Part of the National Territory: Considered as the Only Possible Means of Avoiding the Deleterious Evils Attendant on Slavery in a Republic

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Thomas T. Stiles, No. 251, North Front-street, 1805 - Slavery - 133 pages
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Page 120 - which nature has made; and many other circumstances, will divide us into parties, and produce convulsions, which will probably never end but in the extermination of the one or the other race....To these objections, which are political, may be added others, which are physical and moral. The first difference which strikes us is that of color.
Page 122 - lineaments of wrath, puts on the same airs in the circle of smaller slaves, gives a loose to the worst of passions, and thus nursed, educated, and exercised in tyranny, cannot but be stamped by it with odious peculiarities. The man must be a prodigy who can retain his manners and morals undepraved by such circumstances. And with what execration should the
Page 122 - despots, and these into enemies, destroys the morals of the one part, and the amor patriae of the other. For if a slave can have a country in the world, it must be any other in preference to that in which he is
Page 120 - This unfortunate difference of color, and perhaps of faculty, is a powerful obstacle to the emancipation of these people. Many of their advocates, while they wish to, vindicate the liberty of human nature are anxious also to preserve its dignity and beauty. Some of these, embarrassed by the question
Page 122 - and labor for another: in which he must lock up the faculties of his nature, contribute as far as depends on his individual endeavours to the evanishment of the human race, or entail his own miserable condition on
Page 124 - hope preparing, under the auspices of heaven, for a total emancipation, and that this is disposed, in the order of events, to be with the consent of the masters, rather than by their extirpation.
Page 122 - towards his slave, it should always be a sufficient one, that his child is present. But generally it is not sufficient. " The parent storms, the child looks on, catches
Page 122 - circumstances. And with what execration should the statesmen be loaded, who permitting one half the citizens thus to trample on the rights of the other, transforms those
Page 123 - wrath ? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep
Page 119 - does not itself contain this proposition ; but an amendment containing it was prepared, to be offered to the legislature whenever the bill should be taken up, and further directing, that they should continue with their parents to a certain age, then be brought up, at the public expence, to tillage, arts or sciences, according to their geniuses, till the females should be eighteen, and

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