The English Reader, Or Pieces in Prose and Poetry ...

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Durrie & Peck, 1825 - 263 pages
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Contents

Public Speeches
121
Lord Mansfields speech in the House of Lords 1770
128
Page
131
An address to young persons
132
Earthquake at Calabria in the year 1G38 486
139
Letter from Pliny to Marcelliuus on the death of an amiable young woman Jtt 4 On Discretion
140
On the government of our thoughts
143
On the evils which flow from unrestrained passions
145
On the proper state of our temper with respect to one another 14fi
146
Excellence of the Holy Scriptures
148
Reflections occasioned by a review of the blessings x pronounced by Christ on his disciples in his sermon on the mount
149
Schemes of life often illusory
150
The pleasures of virtuous sensibility
152
On the true honour of man 354
154
The influence of devotion on the happiness of life
155
The planetary and terrestrial worlds comparatively considered
157
On the powen of custom and the uses to which it may be applied
159
The pleasures resulting from a proper use of our faculties l
160
Description of candour
161
On the imperfection of that happiness which rests solely on worldly pleasures
162
What are the real and solid enjoyments of human life
165
Scale of beings lf7
167
Trust in the care of Providence recommended
169
Piety and gratitude enliven prosperity
171
Virtue when deeply rooted is not subject to the in fluence of fortune
173
The speech of Fabricius a Roman ambassador to king Pyrrhus who attempted to bribe him to his interests by the offer of a srreat sum of money
174
Character of James king of England
175
Charles V emperor of Germany resigns his dominions and retires from the world
176
The same subject continued
179

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 228 - On earth, join all ye creatures to extol Him first, Him last, Him midst, and without end.
Page 240 - Hope humbly then ; with trembling pinions soar, Wait the great teacher, Death ; and God adore. What future bliss, he gives not thee to know, But gives that hope to be thy blessing now. Hope springs eternal in the human breast : Man never Is, but always to be blest ; The soul, uneasy, and confined from home, Rests and expatiates in a life to come.
Page 186 - The Epitaph Here rests his head upon the lap of Earth A Youth, to Fortune and to Fame unknown; Fair Science frown'd not on his humble birth, And Melancholy mark'd him for her own.
Page 223 - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute, From the centre all round to the sea, I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Page 254 - Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent : Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect, in a hair as heart; As full, as perfect, in vile man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns : To him no high, no low, no great, no small ; He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.
Page 234 - Though in the paths of death I tread, With gloomy horrors overspread, My steadfast heart shall fear no ill, For thou, O Lord, art with me still ; Thy friendly crook shall give me aid, And guide me through the dreadful shade.
Page 228 - Air, and ye elements, the eldest birth Of Nature's womb, that in quaternion run Perpetual circle, multiform ; and mix And nourish all things ; let your ceaseless change Vary to our great Maker still new praise.
Page 202 - If once right reason drives that cloud away, Truth breaks upon us with resistless day. Trust not yourself; but your defects to know Make use of every friend — and every foe.
Page 205 - Spring, thy Summer's ardent strength. Thy sober Autumn fading into age, And pale concluding Winter comes at last, And shuts the scene. Ah ! whither now are fled Those dreams of greatness? those unsolid hopes Of happiness ? those longings after fame ? Those restless cares ' those busy bustling days ? Those gay-spent, festive nights :
Page 91 - When the ear heard me, then it blessed me ; and when the eye saw me, it gave witness to me ; because I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me : and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.

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