London Magazine: Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer..., Volume 23

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C. Ackers, 1754 - English essays
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Page 182 - Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire; Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire. Blest, who can unconcern'dly find Hours, days, and years, slide soft away In health of body; peace of mind; Quiet by day ; Sound sleep by night; study and ease Together mix'd; sweet recreation, And innocence, which most does please With meditation.
Page 225 - I think there is. Every one has an undoubted right to think freely — nay, it is the duty of every one to do so as far as he has the necessary means and opportunities. This duty, too, is in no case so incumbent on him as in those that regard what I call the first philosophy. They who have neither means nor opportunities of this sort must submit their opinions to authority; and to what authority can they resign...
Page 274 - G — they would do it ; for that, although they were sensible the English could raise two men for their one, yet they knew their motions were too slow and dilatory to prevent any undertaking of theirs. They pretend to have an undoubted right to the river from a discovery made by one La Salle...
Page 552 - Nay, more ; I will not only obey him like an old Roman, as my dictator, but, like a modern Roman, I will implicitly believe in him as my Pope, and hold him to be infallible while in the chair, but no longer. More than this he cannot well require ; for, I presume, that obedience can never be expected, when there is neither terror to enforce, nor interest to invite it.
Page 274 - Delawares, &.c. together at that place; and told them, that they intended to have been down the river this fall, but the waters were growing cold, and the winter advancing, which obliged them to go into quarters ; but that they might assuredly expect them in the spring, with a far greater...
Page 457 - My friend was ashamed of me; but however, to help me off as well as he could, he said to me aloud, "Mr. Fitz-Adam, this is one of those singularities which you have contracted by living so much alone.
Page 552 - I HEARD the other day with great pleasure from my worthy friend Mr. Dodsley, that Mr. Johnson's English Dictionary, with a grammar and history of our language prefixed, will be published this winter in two large volumes in folio. I had long lamented that we had no lawful...
Page 274 - ... in each. The first of them is on French creek, near a small lake, about sixty miles from Venango, near...
Page 124 - To make up one Hermaphrodite ; Still amorous, and fond, and billing, Like Philip and Mary on a shilling...
Page 220 - ... to replace to the finking fund the like fum paid out of the fame, to make good the deficiency on the...

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