Intervention!: The United States and the Mexican Revolution, 1913-1917

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1993 - History - 393 pages
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In May 1916, six American soldiers led by Lieutenant George S. Patton, Jr., surrounded a building near Rubio, Chihuahua. When the occupants burst out of the door, guns blazing, Patton and his men cut them down. A month later seventy American troopers charged into a strong Mexican position at Carrizal; ten were killed and twenty-three taken prisoner. In 1914, a powerful American naval force seized Mexico's principal seaport, Veracruz, and occupied the city for six months. Yet, all the while, Mexico and the United States were technically at peace.

The United States began its involvement in the Mexican Revolution in 1913 with President Woodrow Wilson's decision to remove Victoriana Huerta, leader of a military junta that overthrew and murdered Mexico's president, Francisco Madero. Diplomatic actions failing, Wilson occupied Veracruz, cutting off Huerta's supplies of arms from abroad. When in 1916 the legendary bandit Pancho Villa raided Columbus, New Mexico, Wilson sent General John J. Pershing into Chihuahua to capture him.

This story leads readers to increased respect for the people of Mexico and its revolutionary leaders--Zapata, Obregon, Carranza, and Pancho Villa. It shows that, while American troops performed well, U.S. intervention had no effect on the outcome of the Mexican Revolution. The American army had a taste of battle and Pershing went on to become the greatest American hero of the First World War.
 

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INTERVENTION!: The United States and the Mexican Revolution, 1913-1917

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

An assured popular history of cross-border turmoil that inaugurated more than 75 years of US intervention in Latin American affairs—and that produced lasting resentment in our neighbors to the south ... Read full review

Intervention!: the United States and the Mexican Revolution, 1913-1917

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Eisenhower ( So Far from God : The U.S. War with Mexico , LJ 4/15/89) has written an excellent account of U.S.-Mexican relations from 1913 to 1917. By focusing on the principal leaders in Mexico and ... Read full review

Contents

Assassination
7
Uprising
10
I Have Overthrown This Government
19
Watchful Waiting
30
First Chief
38
The Return of Pancho Villa
46
Huerta Agonistes
60
The Benton Affair
69
You Will Promptly Organize
228
Pancho Villas Narrow Escape
241
Colonia Dublan
251
Gunfight at Parral
260
To the Brink
276
Carrizal
288
Exit the United States
301
The Triumph of Obregon
308

The Tampico Incident
79
The Landing at Veracruz
109
The Clouds of War
125
The Fall of Victoriano Huerta
139
The Convention at Aguascalientes
151
Villas and Zapatas Reign of Terror
165
Carranza by Default
175
Blood on the Border
187
Villa Raids Columbus
217
Epilogue
321
Sequence of Events Mexican Revolution 19101917
329
Visiting Points of Interest
337
The Plan of Guadalupe
343
NOTES
345
BIBLIOGRAPHY
373
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
379
INDEX
381
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

John Eisenhower is the author of several books, including The Bitter Woods, Allies: Pearl Harbor to D-Day, and So Far From God. He lives in Trappe, Maryland.

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