Randolph Caldecott's Picture Books

Front Cover
Huntington Library, 2008 - Art - 236 pages
5 Reviews
The Caldecott Medal, established in 1937 by the American Library Association, is awarded each year to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. While many people are familiar with this prestigious award, relatively few are acquainted with the English illustrator after whom it was named. Randolph Caldecott was one of the most popular book illustrators of the late nineteenth century. His picture books were issued two at a time every Christmas, from 1878 until his death in 1886. He chose the subjects on his own, drawing from a mix of age-old nursery rhymes, pieces by eighteenth-century writers, and nonsense he made up himself.

With their humorous wordplay and exquisite illustrations, Caldecott's picture books continue to engage the imaginations of children and adults alike. This new edition reproduces nine of his most popular stories: The House that Jack Built, The Diverting History of John Gilpin, Sing a Song for Sixpence, The Three Jovial Huntsmen, The Farmer's Boy, The Queen of Hearts, The Milkmaid, Hey Diddle Diddle, and Baby Bunting.

This book is the third in the series of Huntington Library Children's Classics, which include facsimiles of favorite children's books from the Huntington's rare book collections.

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Review: Randolph Caldecott's Picture Books

User Review  - Goodreads

I first read this book years ago in the library. I had to own it. It's so fun to get lost in old England with Randolph Caldecott's illustrations. Read full review

Review: Randolph Caldecott's Picture Books

User Review  - Goodreads

I began reading Sendak's "Caldecott & Co." and realized that I had never read the books that were written and illustrated by the people was talking about. So I put the book down and went looking ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Heralded as the greatest artist of the triumvirate of modern illustrators that included Greenaway and Crane, Randolph Caldecott is highly praised for introducing techniques of animation into picture book art and for his humorous, satiric extensions of the text in his illustrations. Caldecott's fame centers on 16 books, often referred to as the "Toy Books," reprinted by Edmund Evans in his innovative printing techniques, featuring mainly traditional nursery rhymes and songs, and published in pairs. They include: The House That Jack Built (1865), The Diverting History of John Gilpin (written by William Cowper) (1878), Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog (written by Oliver Goldsmith) (1979), Babes in the Wood (1879), Sing a Song of Sixpence (1880), The Three Jovial Huntsmen (1880), The Farmer's Boy (1881), The Queen of Hearts (1881), The Milkmaid (1882), Hey Diddle Diddle with Baby Bunting (1882), A Frog He Would a-Wooing Go (1883), and The Fox Jumps over the Parson's Gate (1884). Caldecott generally drew his illustrations in sepia applied with a brush rather than a pen; he included an average of three uncolored illustrations for each colored one. He has received praise for his fluid style, which created a sense of movement across a page and from one page to another; he is also lauded for his insight into human nature and instinctive grasp of what appeals to children. Each year the American Library Association awards a highly coveted medal in his name to the best illustrated book by an American author.

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