Technical options for the advanced liquid metal reactor

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DIANE Publishing
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Page 38 - Clinton made clear that the United States does not encourage the civil use of plutonium and, accordingly, does not itself engage in plutonium reprocessing for either nuclear power or nuclear explosive purposes.
Page 38 - ... material under IAEA safeguards. Particular attention would be given to materials released in the process of nuclear disarmament and steps to ensure that these materials would not be used again for nuclear weapons.
Page 5 - Barbara oil spill, have moved public opinion in the past and will probably continue to do so in the future.
Page 29 - ... dismantled weapons may also affect and be affected by civilian nuclear power programs, a topic that depends on economic, political, and technical factors outside the scope of this study. In some countries, nuclear power programs already include the use of plutonium in the fuel loaded into reactors. But the amount of weapons plutonium likely to be surplus is small on the scale of global nuclear power use - the equivalent of only a few months of fuel for existing reactors - and it is not essential...
Page 35 - AN ASSESSMENT OF THE PROLIFERATION POTENTIAL AND INTERNATIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE INTEGRAL FAST REACTOR fl.
Page 38 - ... announced a non-proliferation initiative that included some first steps in the directions recommended above, among them a proposal for a global convention banning production of fissile materials for weapons; a voluntary offer to put US excess fissile materials under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards; and a recognition that plutonium disposition is an important non-proliferation problem requiring renewed interagency, and ultimately international, attention. This is a much needed...
Page 38 - ... nearly complete elimination of the world's plutonium stocks. On September 27 1993, the Clinton administration announced a non-proliferation initiative that included some first steps in the directions recommended above, among them a proposal for a global convention banning production of fissile materials for weapons; a voluntary offer to put US excess fissile materials under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards; and a recognition that plutonium disposition is an important non-proliferation...

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