HAWAIIAN ALMANAC AND ANNUAL FOR 1904

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Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 1917 - Hawaii
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Page 155 - ... a song in which they all join. In dancing they seldom move their feet, but throw themselves into a variety of attitudes, sometimes all squatting and at other times springing up at the same instant.
Page 109 - ... because of the certainty that the time would come when his words would be carried into effect. The King remained quiet without saying a word, keeping his thoughts to himself. After this conference the King took Kaopulupulu to be his priest, and in course of time he became also an intimate companion, in constant attendance upon the King, and counselled him in the care of his subjects, old and young, in all that pertained to their welfare. The King regarded his words, and in their circuit of the...
Page 135 - The noio lives wholly upon fish, to obtain which it habitually makes excursions offshore 10 or 15 miles. Indeed, comparatively little of its food is obtained inshore, though occasionally they may be seen slowly winnowing their way along the surf-streaked coast and scanning the heaving billows with anxious eye for their quarry. " While following its prey on the broad ocean the noio is of much service to the Hawaiian fishermen, and acts as his pilot; for its presence in numbers in a given spot marks...
Page 244 - ... and other matters and proceedings as between the courts of the United States and the courts of the several States shall govern in such matters and proceedings as between the courts of the United States and the courts of the Territory of Hawaii. Regular terms of said court shall be held at Honolulu on the second Monday in April and...
Page 175 - Hawaiian almanac and annual for 1897: a handbook of information on matters relating to the Hawaiian islands, original and selected, of value to merchants, tourists, and others.
Page 105 - Maui, became the governing chief (alii aimokii) of Oahu, Kahulupue was chosen by him as his priest. This chief did evil unto his subjects, seizing their property and beheading and maiming many with the leiomano (shark's tooth weapon) and pahoa (dagger), without provocation, so that he became a reproach to his people. From such treatment Kahulupue endeavored to dissuade him, assuring him that such a course would fail to win their support and obedience, whereas the supplying of food and fish, with...
Page 135 - ... they may be seen slowly winnowing their way along the surf-streaked coast and scanning the heaving billows with anxious eye for their quarry. " While following its prey on the broad ocean the noio is of much service to the Hawaiian fishermen, and acts as his pilot; for its presence in numbers in a given spot marks the whereabouts of shoals of noi, a long silvery minnow, and there also is sure to be found the aku, or skipjack, much sought after by the fishermen. This tern never dives for fish,...
Page 128 - Above, including upper surface of wings and tail, clear and somewhat glossy black. Border of under wing-coverts black. Beneath, including under tail-coverts, pure white. Maxilla and edge and tip of mandible black; rest of maxilla light brown. Tarsus and feet light yellow, but black along the outer posterior side of tarsus, the outer toe and half the middle toe. Wing, 8.65; tail, 3.75; bill, 1.28; tarsus, 1.80. Puffinus nativitatis Streets. Christmas Island Shearwater. Recorded by Mr. Bryan in his...
Page 223 - Sundays and legal holidays excepted. Provided, however, that any such term may be extended by the presiding Judge for not more than twelve days after the expiration of the said twentyfourth day.
Page 112 - Alapai, and hid in the shrub&ery of the hills. They went to Aliomanu, Moanalua, to a place called Kinimakalehua ; then moved along to Keanapuaa and Kepookala, at the lochs of Puuloa, and from there to upper Waipio ; thence to Wahiawa...

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