The History and Topography of Dauphin, Cumberland, Franklin, Bedford, Adams, and Perry Counties [Pennsylvania]: Containing a Brief History of the First Settlers, Notices of the Leading Events, Incidents and Interesting Facts, Both General and Local, in the History of These Counties, General & Statistical Descriptions of All the Principal Boroughs, Towns, Villages, &c., with an Appendix ... Comp. from Numerous Authentic Sources

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G. Hills, 1846 - Adams County (Pa.) - 606 pages
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Amazing book. Full of orginal documentation, letters, newspaper articles, records. Written and compiled in a manner that enables the reader to feel the harrowing experiences of the French and Indian War on the Settlers of Pennsylvania. This book is used as a reference in other histories of this time. Excellent. 

Contents

I
25
II
38
III
51
IV
57
V
66
VI
73
VII
97
VIII
127
XXIII
364
XXIV
377
XXV
385
XXVI
411
XXVII
424
XXIX
449
XXX
461
XXXI
476

IX
137
X
157
XI
162
XII
173
XIII
192
XIV
201
XV
208
XVI
223
XVII
247
XVIII
265
XIX
299
XX
326
XXI
340
XXII
346
XXXII
481
XXXIII
484
XXXIV
488
XXXV
495
XXXVI
511
XXXVII
514
XXXVIII
519
XXXIX
526
XL
537
XLI
540
XLII
545
XLIII
552
XLIV
555

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Page 93 - sa very sorrowful spectacle to see those that escaped with their lives with not a mouthful to eat, or bed to lie on, or clothes to cover their nakedness, or keep them warm, but all they had consumed into ashes. These deplorable circumstances cry aloud for your...
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Page 338 - He seemed to be sincere, honest, and conscientious in his own way, and according to his own religious notions ; which was more than I ever saw in any other Pagan. I perceived that he was looked upon and derided among most of the Indians, as a precise zealot, who made a needless noise about religious matters ; but I must say...
Page 338 - Now that I like : so God has taught me," &c. And some of his sentiments seemed very just. Yet he utterly denied the being of a devil, and declared there was no such \\ creature known among the Indians of old times, whose religion he supposed he was attempting to revive. He likewise told me, that departed souls all went southward, and that the difference between the good and...
Page 335 - ... sometimes raised the flame to a prodigious height, at the same time yelling and shouting in such a manner that they might easily have been heard two miles or more. They continued their sacred dance all night, or near the matter; after which they ate the flesh of the sacrifice, and so retired each one to his lodging.

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