A History of Christian Thought, from Its Judaic and Hellenistic Origins to Existentialism

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Simon and Schuster, Nov 15, 1972 - Religion - 550 pages
7 Reviews
In A History of Christian Thought, Paul Tillich has accomplished the supremely difficult feat of creating a work at once brilliantly authoritative and comprehensive, while remaining clear and uncluttered by scholarly annotation and debate. Originally delivered as lectures at the Union Theological Seminary and at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago, this edition has been superbly edited by Carl E. Braaten of the Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago. From the "preparation for Christianity" implicit in the kairos and the Mystery Religions to the individualism of Bultmann, Troeltsch, and Barth, Professor Tillich guides the reader through the fascinating history of Christian thought with a confidence and clarity of presentation only a great scholar and teacher possesses. Book jacket.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - davidpwithun - LibraryThing

From beginning to end, this book is a masterpiece of Christian intellectual history. Tillich's insights into the minds and works of the greatest thinkers of Christian history, especially Origen ... Read full review

Review: A History of Christian Thought

User Review  - Goodreads

What is best in Tillich's history is that it's interpretative history. It is pure intellectual, no facts or events. He shows ideas and gives his judgment on them, in a very personal way. Since he was ... Read full review

Contents

The Preparation for Christianity
1
Theological Developments in the Ancient Church
17
H The Trinitarian Controversy
68
II Trends in the Middle Ages
134
Roman Catholicism from Trent to the Present
210
The Theology of the Protestant Reformers
227
The Development of Protestant Theology
276
Problem and Method
297
Marxs Political Existentialism
484
The Prophetic Element in Marx
485
F Voluntarism and the Philosophy of Life
487
Schopenhauers Idea of the Will
488
Nietzsches Idea of WillToPower
493
Nietzsches Doctrine of Resentment
494
The Death of God and the New Ideal of Man
497
New Ways of Mediation
504

Oscillating Emphases in Orthodoxy Pietism
305
The Enlightenment and Its Problems
320
Intrinsic Conflicts of Enlightenment
349
Kant Moral Religion and Radical Evil
360
The ClassicRomantic Reaction against
367
The Synthesis of Religion and Culture
419
The Breakdown of the Universal Synthesis
432
Ethical Existence and the Human Situation Anxiety Despair
462
The Nature of Faith The Leap and Existential Truth
464
Criticism of Theology and Church
472
E Political Radicalism and its Theological Significance
476
The Bourgeois Radicals
477
Marxs Relation to Hegel and Feuerbach
478
Marxs View of the Human Situation Alienation
480
Marxs Doctrine of Ideology and His Attack on Religion
481
A Experience and the Biblical Message
506
Martin Kahler
509
B The Back to Kant Movement
511
Adolf von Harnack
515
Miscellaneous Movements in Theology
520
Radical Criticism
521
Rudolf Bultmann
523
The HistoryofReligions Approach
524
Ernst Troeltsch
526
Religious Socialism
530
Karl Barth
535
Existentialism
539
Index of Names
543
Index of Subjects
547
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About the author (1972)

Paul Johannes Tillich was born into a German Lutheran pastor's family in that part of Germany that is now Poland. He attended several universities, earning the doctorate in philosophy in 1910, then taught at several more from 1919 to 1933. Removed from his professorate at Frankfurt by the Nazi government, he emigrated to the United States, with the encouragement of Reinhold Niebuhr, and taught at Union Theological Seminary in New York (1933--55), Harvard University (1955--62), and the University of Chicago (1962--65). The fullest biography, including some fairly lurid material of a psychosexual nature, can be found in the appreciative work by Wilhelm and Marion Pauck. The student who wants to encounter Tillich at his most succinct might turn to The Courage To Be (1952) or The Theology of Paul Tillich (1982). He is sometimes classified as Neo-orthodox, but that label does not fit him as well as it does Karl Barth, who had small regard for Tillich's "theology of correlation," where responding to the world's questions is seen as the proper way of practicing theology.

Carl E. Braaten is professor emeritus of systematic theology at Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago and former executive director of the Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology.

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