Cuban Insurrection 1952-1959

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Transaction Publishers, Dec 31, 2011 - History - 450 pages
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The Cuban Insurrection Is an In-depth study of the first stage of the Cuban Revolution, the years from 1952 to 1959. The volume depicts the origins of the conflict, details the middle years, and ends with Fidel Castro's victorious arrival In Havana on January 8, 1959. Based on a wealth of hitherto unpublished original material, including confidential military reports, letters from various leaders of the insurrection and data gathered from Interviews held In Cuba and abroad, the book Is a descriptive historical analysis of the struggle against military dictator Fulgencio Batista. The authors challenge the traditional premise that Cuba's Insurrection began in the rural areas and only later expanded into urban areas. Instead they argue that the insurrectionary struggle was based upon combined urban-rural guerrilla warfare against the regular army. Basically, The Cuban Insurrection treats two major movements Involved In the struggle—The Directorio Revolucionario and the M-26-7—and examines the growth, ideology, conflicts, and military strategies of their respective rural and urban organizations. The book Includes a detailed analysis of combat, strikes, uprisings, and expeditions. Original maps and charts illustrate battles, maneuvers, and guerrilla political structures.
 

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Contents

The Manifesto of Escambray
179
The DR Guerrilla Front
181
Internal Division
185
The Second Front of Escambray
186
The Second Front Frank Pais in Oriente Province
187
Structural Organization
192
The Frustrated Strike April 9 1958
198
Genesis of the Strike
201

General Amnesty
34
The Search for a Movement
36
The Student Movement
41
Batista and the Students
42
Jose Antonio Echeverria
44
Santa Marta and Lindero
47
The Directorio Revolucionario
49
Ideology of the DR
51
A New Escalation
52
The Sugar Workers Strike and the DR
56
Prologue to Insurrection
61
The Exiles
64
Heroes or Martyrs
65
Che Guevara
66
The Pact of Mexico
69
Creating the Conditions
72
The Making of the Guerrillas
76
A Matter of Arms
77
The Santiago Uprising
79
Conditions in Havana
84
Disaster and Recovery
85
Initial Setback and Regrouping
88
The Assault on La Plata
89
Treason and a New Beginning
90
Reinforcements from the Cities
93
The Battle of El Uvero
95
Estrada Palma Bueycito Pino del Agua
96
Organization of the Regular Army
97
Pino del Agua II
98
Elements of the Mystique
100
The Palace Attack
106
The Strategy
109
The Attack
113
Aftermath
120
The Executive Council Meets
121
Humboldt 7
127
Praises to Batista
130
Challenge and Repression
134
The Death of Frank Pais
138
The Cienfuegos Uprising
147
Ideology and Politics
153
Its Ideology
154
The Tampa Declaration
160
Junta de Liberacion Cubana
161
Castro versus Chomon
165
A New Strategy
173
The DRs Decision to Fight Guerrilla War
175
The Expedition
176
The PerezRay Interview
207
Objections to the Strike
210
The Call to Strike
211
The Meeting at Altos de Mompie
215
The May Report
218
The Communists
220
The New Reality
222
The Aftermath
223
The Summer Offensive
226
Military Plans
229
Problems of Command
231
The Army
233
Santo Domingo
236
Unity of the Insurrectional Sector
237
The Pact of Caracas
238
An Intrepid Maneuver
240
Confidential Report
247
Operation N
250
The Battle of Las Mercedes
251
Progressive Disintegration of the Armed Forces
260
The Westward March
266
Guevara Chomon and Menoyo
279
Guevara and Oltusky
281
The Last Battle
286
November Farce
288
The Strategy
292
The Battle
293
The Armored Train
297
The Fall of Santa Clara
299
The Final Decision Batista Leaves
302
The CastroCantillo Meeting
306
Batista and Cantillo Meet
308
Plots and Counterplots
309
The Last Decision
311
Now What Do We Do General?
313
The Perils of Counterrevolution
318
The Mirage of Power
322
The Revolution
328
Appendices
332
Major Events of the Urban Insurrection 19521959
338
Guerrilla Actions Against the Regular Army December 21956December 31 1958
344
Population in Selected Cities
345
Density and Distribution of Population by Province 19531958
347
Notes
348
Bibliography
409
Index
440
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Page 28 - ... ingenuity and all the tolerance the members of the United Nations could muster. It was easy enough to agree that all states must respect individual human rights, but what are these rights? The stirring declarations of the past — from the Magna Carta to the Declaration of Independence of the United States and the Declaration of the Rights of Man of the French Revolution — were written by men who were in agreement on the rights they considered 120 fundamental.
Page 27 - ... order to effect its implementation and punish those who had violated it — there being no organization for holding elections to accomplish this — the revolutionary movement, as the momentous incarnation of this sovereignty, the only source of legitimate power, would have assumed all the faculties inherent to it, except that of modifying the Constitution itself: In other words it would have assumed the legislative, executive and judicial powers.
Page 27 - The First Revolutionary Law would have returned power to the people and proclaimed the Constitution of 1940 the supreme Law of the land, until such time as the people should decide to modify or change it.

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About the author (2011)

Ramdn L. Bonachea was born In Cuba and was a participant In the insurrection he describes in this volume. He has taught Latin American history at Montclalr State College and at The American University School of International Studies.

Marta San Martin left her native Cuba In 1962. She has taught courses in Latin America and Western Civilization at Southampton College.

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