Transactions, Volumes 7-9

Front Cover
American Society of Agricultural Engineers, 1913 - Agricultural engineering
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Page 203 - ... investigations and experiments in animal husbandry; for experiments in animal feeding and breeding, including cooperation with the State agricultural experiment stations and other agencies, including repairs and additions to and erection of buildings absolutely necessary to carry on the experiments, including the employment of labor in the city of Washington and elsewhere...
Page 202 - ... kinds of power and appliances, the flow of water in ditches, pipes, and other conduits, the duty, apportionment, and measurement of irrigation water, the customs, regulations, and laws affecting irrigation, and the drainage of farms and of swamps and other wet lands which may be made available for agricultural purposes...
Page 135 - MANAGEMENT. The department believes that intelligent help to women in matters of home management will contribute directly to the agricultural success of the farm. It purposes, therefore, to ask Congress for means and authority to make more complete studies of domestic conditions on the farm, to experiment with labor-saving devices and methods, and to study completely the question of practical sanitation and hygienic protection for the farm family. The farmer's wife rarely has access to the cities...
Page 142 - Not more than seven wires shall be simultaneously immersed, and not more than one sample of galvanized material, other than wire, shall be immersed in the specified quantity of solution. The samples shall not be grouped or twisted together, but shall be well separated so as to permit the action of the solution to be uniform upon all immersed portions of the samples.
Page 202 - ... pipes, and other conduits ; the duty, apportionment, and measurement of irrigation water; the customs, regulations, and laws affecting irrigation ; for the purchase and installation of equipment for experimental purposes ; for the giving of expert advice and assistance; for the preparation and illustration of reports and bulletins on irrigation ; for the employment of assistants and labor in the city of Washington and elsewhere ; for rent outside of the District of Columbia; and for supplies...
Page 202 - State, county, or other public agencies or with farm bureaus, organizations, or individuals; for investigating and reporting upon the utilization of water in farm irrigation and the best methods to apply in practice, the different kinds of power and appliances, the flow of water in ditches...
Page 202 - ... the best methods to apply in practice, the different kinds of power and appliances, the flow of water in ditches, pipes, and other conduits, the duty, apportionment, and measurement of irrigation water, the customs, regulations, and laws affecting irrigation...
Page 13 - The cooking of 3 meals a day on a meager allowance of water will necessitate 10 buckets, which will make for cooking alone 1,200 pounds of lifting per day. When to this is added the water necessary for bathing, scrubbing, and the weekly wash, it will easily bring the lift per day up to a ton; and the lifting of a ton a day will take the elasticity out of a woman's step, the bloom out of her cheek, and the enjoyment from her soul.
Page 57 - The author has investigated the subject by suspending in septic tanks a large number of solid organic substances, such as cooked vegetables, cabbages, turnips, potatoes, peas, beans, bread, various forms of cellulose, flesh in the form of the dead bodies of animals, skinned and unskinned, various kinds of fat, bones, cartilage, etc., and has shown that many of these substances are almost completely dissolved in from three to four weeks. They first presented a swollen appearance, and increased in...
Page 267 - As to the influence of machinery on farm labor, all intelligent expert observation declares it beneficial. It has relieved the laborer of much drudgery ; made his work and his hours of service shorter ; stimulated his mental faculties ; given an equilibrium of effort to mind and body ; made the laborer a more efficient worker, a broader man and a better citizen".

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