Campaign Crossroads: Presidential Politics in Indiana from Lincoln to Obama

Front Cover
Indiana Historical Society, 2017 - History - 622 pages

Campaign Crossroads looks back over the varied, sometimes important, sometimes irrelevant, but always interesting presidential campaign cycles in Indiana’s history. By taking in the influences of technology, transportation and communication itself, we see an evolution in the political process that is not only altogether Hoosier, but also altogether American in its quality and importance.

Using a narrative approach with a mix of primary and secondary sources, the work examines not only the rhetoric of presidents and presidential hopefuls, but also the nature of campaigns and their impact on Indiana communities. While Indiana enjoyed the position of being a battleground state for the better part of a century from the 1870s until the 1960s, it has also been ignored, dismissed, and has on occasion created unexpected political drama.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1 Era of Expansion and Political Reform 181659
5
Chapter 2 Civil War and Reconstruction 186079
27
Chapter 3 The Gilded Age 188099
75
Chapter 4 The Industrial Revolution 190011
125
Chapter 5 World War I and the Great Depression 191231
159
Chapter 6 The New Deal Era and World War II 193245
223
Chapter 7 The Postwar Era 194659
257
Chapter 8 The New Frontier and Great Society 196067
311
Chapter 9 Civil Rights and Vietnam 196871
365
Chapter 10 The Watergate Era 197279
403
Chapter 11 The Republication Revolution 198091
457
Chapter 12 The New Millennium 19922008
501
Notes
569
Index
601
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2017)

  Andrew E. Stoner is assistant professor of public relations in the Department of Communication Studies at California State University, Sacramento. An Indiana native, he holds a PhD from Colorado State University, a master’s degree from Ball State University, and a bachelor’s degree from Franklin College.

Bibliographic information