Saturn from Cassini-Huygens

Front Cover
Michele Dougherty, Larry Esposito, Stamatios Krimigis
Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 30, 2009 - Science - 805 pages
This book is one of two volumes meant to capture, to the extent practical, the scienti?c legacy of the Cassini-Huygens prime mission, a landmark in the history of planetary exploration. As the most ambitious and interdisciplinary planetary exploration mission ?own to date, it has extended our knowledge of the Saturn system to levels of detail at least an order of magnitude beyond that gained from all previous missions to Saturn. Nestled in the brilliant light of the new and deep understanding of the Saturn planetary system is the shiny nugget that is the spectacularly successful collaboration of individuals, - ganizations and governments in the achievement of Cassini-Huygens. In some ways the pa- nershipsformedandlessonslearnedmaybethemost enduringlegacyofCassini-Huygens.The broad, international coalition that is Cassini-Huygens is now conducting the Cassini Equinox Mission and planning the Cassini Solstice Mission, and in a major expansion of those fruitful efforts, has extended the collaboration to the study of new ?agship missions to both Jupiter and Saturn. Such ventures have and will continue to enrich us all, and evoke a very optimistic vision of the future of international collaboration in planetary exploration. The two volumes in the series Saturn from Cassini-Huygens and Titan from Cassini- Huygens are the direct products of the efforts of over 200 authors and co-authors. Though each book has a different set of three editors, the group of six editors for the two volumes has worked together through every step of the process to ensure that these two volumes are a set.
 

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Nice needs more info on the energy transfer part but otherwise ok

Contents

Chapter 1
1
Chapter 2
9
Chapter 3
55
Chapter 4
75
Chapter 5
83
Chapter 6
113
Chapter 7
161
Chapter 8
181
Chapter 15
459
Chapter 16
510
Chapter 17
537
Chapter 18
577
Chapter 19
613
Chapter 20
636
Chapter 21
683
Chapter 22
725

Chapter 9
202
Chapter 10
257
Chapter 11
280
Chapter 12
333
Chapter 13
375
Chapter 14
413
Chapter 23
745
Chapter 24
762
Appendix The Cassini Orbiter Behind the Scenes
783
Index
795
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Michele Dougherty, Cassini Saturn Orbiter (NASA/ESA) - Acting Principal Investigator (PI) for magnetometer instrument.

Dr. Esposito the principal investigator of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) experiment on the Cassini space mission to Saturn. He was chair of the Voyager Rings Working Group. As a member of the Pioneer Saturn imaging team, he discovered Saturn’s F ring. He has been a participant in numerous US, Russian and European space missions and used the Hubble Space Telescope for its first observations of the planet Venus. He was awarded the Harold C. Urey Prize from the American Astronomical Society, The NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, and the Richtmyer Lecture Award from the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Physical Society.

Dr. Esposito has written his Ph.D dissertation, numerous scientific publications, scholarly reviews on the topic of planetary rings as well as the Cambridge University Press book Planetary Rings. Along with his students and colleagues he continues to actively research the nature and history of planetary rings at the University of Colorado, where he has been since 1977. He is now Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and a member of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP).

He has been an officer of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society and of the Committee for Space Research (COSPAR) of the International Council of Scientific Unions. He was chair of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX). He is a member of American Astronomical Society, American Geophysical Union and International Astronomical Union.

Dr. Stamatios (Tom) Krimigis has been at APL since 1968, after earning his B. Physics from the University of Minnesota (1961), and his M.S. (1963) and Ph.D. (1965) in Physics from the University of Iowa and serving as Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy there. He became Supervisor of Space Physics and Instrumentation in the Space Department, Chief Scientist in 1980, Department Head in 1991, and Emeritus Head in 2004. He is Principal Investigator on several NASA spacecraft, including Voyagers 1 and 2 to the Outer Planets and the Voyager Interstellar Mission, and the Cassini mission to Saturn and Titan. He has designed and built instruments that have flown to seven of the nine planets, and hopes to complete the set with his participation in the MESSENGER mission to Mercury and New Horizons mission to Pluto. He has published more than 370 papers in journals and books on the physics of the sun, interplanetary medium, planetary magnetospheres, and the heliosphere. He is recipient of NASA's Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal twice, is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, American Geophysical Union, and American Association for the Advancement of Science, recipient of COSPAR's Space Science Award in 2002, a recipient of the Basic Sciences Award of the International Academy of Astronautics where he serves on the Board of Trustees, and was elected recently to the newly established chair of "Science of Space" of the Academy of Athens.

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