The Political and Statistical History of Gujarát

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R. Bentley, 1835 - Gujarat (India) - 427 pages
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writer was muslim so he had written in fully biased way .......

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Page 301 - Fate having decreed the destruction of the government, its servants, by disregarding all sacred ties in the midst of rebellions, went to war among each other ; so, under the semblance of friendship, they openly committed acts of hostility, until at length, those parties being set aside, the powers and seals of this kingdom were transferred to the hands of the illustrious descendant of Teimoor — Jelal-ood-deen Mohummed Akbar.
Page 138 - ... but consider it has been applied, in a general way, to designate the Sovereign of the eastern country ; and is derived from the Sanskrit Ptirva, meaning Eastern. It is here so applied, I would say ; and that there was once a connexion between Kanauj and Gujarat is evident from what Abu Zeid al-Hasan of Siraf, the Arabian traveller, in the middle of the ninth century, says of the Indians, " who have devotees and doctors known by the name of Bramins. They have poets also who compose verses, stuffed...
Page 31 - Habibu-s-Sair, a strong fortress ; of which the ruler, a person of rank and consequence, and an idolater, is said to have submitted, and adopted the faith of Islam. The name of this fortress is not given, but (') Ferishta, and the Habibu-s-Sair. As the spring season is, however, mentioned, and as Hij. 409 commenced the 20th May,' AD 1018, Mahmud must have left Ghazni in the end of the preceding Hijira year 408 ; which would correspond with the spring of AD 1018. Mohammedan historians, not attending...
Page 42 - Mahmud, on entering the temple, observed a covered apartment, whose roof was supported by six pillars set with jewels k ; and here stood the idol. (k) (Habibu-s-Sair.) This apartment was the recess, •which is placed at the extreme end of the temples dedicated to Siva. Six pillars are as many as could be, in all probability, studded with jewels, and no more are mentioned in my copy of 41 The latter was broken in pieces by the king's own hand ; and orders were given to his attendants, that the pieces,...
Page 189 - ... having appointed a kazi and a preacher to the mosque, he there established the Mohammedan faith. In that same year he rebuilt the fortified wall at the town of Mangni, ' a dependancy of Songarh, and stationed a party of troops there for the protection of the country ; but, in consequence of a letter6 received from his uncle, Shams Khan Dindani, who was the ruler of Nagore, he soon after returned from thence. They also relate, that at this time, Shams Khan's four front teeth became elongated,...
Page 39 - Habibu-s-Sair. the revenue of ten thousand villages6 was assigned for the support of its temple ; two thousand Brahmans performed the ceremonies of its worship ; five hundred dancing women, with three hundred musicians, were ready to perform before it ; many smaller images of gold and silver, in the temple, surrounded this the greatest of the gods ; and three hundred barbers were waiting to shave the devotees who sought admittance to the holy place. Such was the popularity of this obscene worship...
Page 64 - Draviraa, though limited in its most confined sense to the eastern shore of the Peninsula, between the Palar and Koartilair rivers, has been here extended to include the maritime part of Telingana. By the traditionary history and native annals of Orissa, the fact of its invasion, from the north, about this time, is sufficiently well authenticated b. The Vansavali, or genealogical list of (*) The sea coast, at the summit of the bay of Bengal, from point Godaveri to Cape Negrais is known in the Puranas...
Page 411 - Many of the great landholders, who were Jagirdars, performed the usual services until the time of Aurangzib; but, at present, the provincial governor raises a force, and collects a tribute from the Bantutars, in possession of the Talpat, in proportion to the capability of each place ; while he takes security from his own Amildars. But, when the great landholders refuse to pay the tribute, what power has the provincial governor to enforce it ? and so faithless have they become, that he cannot pass...
Page 403 - ... there be none to claim the property, let him place it in security, sending, at the same time, an account of such to Court, so that when the true heir appears he may obtain the same". In fine, let him act conscientiously and virtuously in this matter, lest it should be the same here as in the kingdom of Constantinople. 7th. Let him be very careful that there should be no wine within his limits ; and let the judge punish the drinker, the seller, and the maker of such, in such a manner as to be...
Page 162 - Kambay ; and, having destroyed the idol of Somnath, which had been again set up after the time of Mahmud of Ghazni, sent all the effects and women of Raja Karan to Dehli, and presented them to the Sultan. The daughter of Raja Karan, who was named Dewalde, having arrived at Dehli, Khizr Khan, the son of Aland-din Khilji, became enamoured of her beauty ; and the circumstance being made known to his father, the latter gave her in marriage to his son, whilst he himself formed an unlawful connexion with...

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