Take Back Your Government

Front Cover
Phoenix Pick, Jan 25, 2012 - Political Science - 246 pages
6 Reviews
Before the Tea Party, the Coffee Party, the "Occupy" movement, Ross Perot or even the Libertarian Party, there was Robert Heinlein, a prophetic mastermind, calling to the people to organize in a grassroots movement to take back their government and to find an effective voice for their individual selves. *** Originally titled How to be a Politician, the book was written in 1946 based on Heinlein's own political experiences, in particular his efforts on behalf of Upton Sinclair to become the governor of California and for Sinclair's landmark effort to End Poverty in California (EPIC). *** Though Heinlein is best known for his science fiction work, he always had strong political views and often involved himself with various causes, including personally paying for advertisements in newspapers propagating his views.*** Here is a fascinating look, both historically and philosophically, at a great visionary's take on the political landscape in the United States, and what each of us can do to better this country.

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Review: Take Back Your Government: A Practical Handbook for the Private Citizen Who Wants Democracy to Work

User Review  - Rick Bavera - Goodreads

Lots of interesting information here on practical political work at a (mostly) local level. Written in 1946, this edition was from 1992, when Perot was running for President. Oh, how things might be very different if Perot had won! Read full review

Review: Take Back Your Government: A Practical Handbook for the Private Citizen Who Wants Democracy to Work

User Review  - Jim - Goodreads

Timeless good advice. Read full review

About the author (2012)

Robert Anson Heinlein was born on July 7, 1907 in Butler, Mo. The son of Rex Ivar and Bam Lyle Heinlein, Robert Heinlein had two older brothers, one younger brother, and three younger sisters. Moving to Kansas City, Mo., at a young age, Heinlein graduated from Central High School in 1924 and attended one year of college at Kansas City Community College. Following in his older brother's footsteps, Heinlein entered the Navel Academy in 1925. After contracting pulmonary tuberculosis, of which he was later cured, Heinlein retired from the Navy and married Leslyn MacDonald. Heinlein was said to have held jobs in real estate and photography, before he began working as a staff writer for Upton Sinclair's EPIC News in 1938. Still needing money desperately, Heinlein entered a writing contest sponsored by the science fiction magazine Thrilling Wonder Stories. Heinlein wrote and submitted the story "Life-Line," which went on to win the contest. This guaranteed Heinlein a future in writing. Using his real name and the pen names Caleb Saunders, Anson MacDonald, Lyle Monroe, John Riverside, and Simon York, Heinlein wrote numerous novels including For Us the Living, Methuselah's Children, and Starship Troopers, which was adapted into a big-budget film for Tri-Star Pictures in 1997. The Science Fiction Writers of America named Heinlein its first Grand Master in 1974, presented 1975. Officers and past presidents of the Association select a living writer for lifetime achievement. Also, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame inducted Heinlein in 1998. Heinlein died in 1988 from emphysema and other related health problems. Heinlein's remains were scattered from the stern of a Navy warship off the coast of California.

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