The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Volume 82

Front Cover
Richard Watson Gilder
Scribner & Company; The Century Company, 1911 - American literature
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Page 501 - Time qualifies the spark and fire of it. There lives within the very flame of love A kind of wick, or snuff, that will abate it; And nothing is at a like goodness still ; For goodness, growing to a plurisy, Dies in his own too-much.
Page 45 - I smile, And cry, Content, to that which grieves my heart ; And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, And frame my face to all occasions.
Page 517 - It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul — Let me not name it to you, you chaste stars ! — It is the cause.
Page 438 - There are three things which are unfilial, and to have no posterity is the greatest of them.
Page 517 - Twere now to be most happy, for I fear My soul hath her content so absolute That not another comfort like to this Succeeds in unknown fate.
Page 135 - I beheld such pomp of cities and palaces as was never yet beheld by the waking eye, unless in the clouds.
Page 135 - battlements that on their restless fronts bore stars " — might have been copied from my architectural dreams, for it often occurred. We hear it reported of Dryden, and of Fuseli in modern times, that they thought proper to eat raw meat for the sake of obtaining splendid dreams: how much better, for such a purpose, to have eaten opium, which yet I do not remember that any poet is recorded to have done, except the dramatist Shadwell...
Page 135 - The appearance, instantaneously disclosed, Was of a mighty City — boldly say A wilderness of building, sinking far And self-withdrawn into a wondrous depth, Far sinking into splendour — without end ! Fabric it seemed of diamond and of gold, With alabaster domes, and silver spires, And blazing terrace upon terrace, high Uplifted...
Page 41 - And although he were a Prince in military virtue approved, jealous of the honour of the English nation, and likewise a good law-maker, for the ease and solace of the common people...
Page 459 - They declared against superstition on the one hand, and enthusiasm on the other. They loved the constitution of the Church, and the Liturgy, and could well live under them: But they did not think it unlawful to live under another form. They wished that things might have been carried with more moderation. And they continued to keep a good correspondence with those who had differed from them in opinion, and allowed a great freedom both in philosophy and in divinity: From whence they were called men...

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