The interrupted wedding, by the author of 'Mary Powell'.

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1864
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Page 298 - ... cloth, embroidered with black. The coloured fillet over her forehead was ornamented with a gay bow in front, and behind each ear was a nosegay of the brightest flowers. Her rich brown hair, parted in front, fell, in a profusion of clustering curls, on her neck, and hung down the back in the long-braided band of maidenhood. She spoke alternately Wallack, Magyar, and German, as she in turns scolded, directed, and coaxed. Before we ceased wondering at so pleasant an apparition, a good supper was...
Page 298 - ... cloudy weather prevented, overtook us in a light waggon of the country, with which he had gallopped over difficulties our heavier carriage had stuck fast in. It was quite dark when we stopped before some house where the sound of music led us to suppose we had found an inn. We were mistaken, however, and while the servant was making inquiries, and receiving answers which he could not understand, as to the whereabouts of the hostelry, a gipsy girl came out of the house, and hearing the nature of...
Page 284 - St gave me his word of honour that we were perfectly safe from any surprise by the enemy, and my men were abundantly supplied with wine and meat; and, while they made themselves comfortable outside, I found myself in Paradise, between two beautiful and amiable females, opposite to a friend whom I had not seen for a long time, and before a glass of exquisite Tokay. All weariness vanished; and we joked and laughed half the night, forgetting the war, and Kossuth, and national hatred.
Page 282 - This branch of industry is almost entirely in the hands of the gipsies. The Government grants a gipsy band the privilege of washing the sands of a certain brook, on condition of their paying a yearly rent, which is never less than three ducats in pure gold per head for every washer. A gipsy judge, or captain, settles this matter with the government, and is answerable for the rest of the tribe from whom he collects the whole of their earnings, and, after paying the tribute, redivides it.
Page 217 - Young man, honour your bride. It is God's will that she should be your companion and friend, not your servant : this our Father in Heaven evinced, by making the woman out of the man's rib. If God had meant the woman to be the man's servant, He would have made her out of the man's heel, to indicate that she should be his foot-stool ; but the All- wise made her out of the part next to the man's heart where she should reside.
Page 281 - ... impossible to imagine a more savage scene. Children of both sexes to the age of fourteen, are seen rolling about with a mere shred of covering, and their elders with much less than the most unfastidious decency requires. Filth obstructs the passage into every hut. As the stranger approaches, crowds of black urchins flock round him, and rather demand than beg for charity. The screams of men and women, and the barking of dogs — for the whole tribe seems to be in a state of constant warfare —...
Page 301 - Super royal 1 6mo., price 3s. 6rf. cloth, 4s. 6rf. coloured, gilt edges. ** Enthusiasm is not our usual fashion, but the excellence of these stories is so greatly above the average of most clever tales for the play-room, that we are tempted to reward the author with admiration."— Athenaeum.
Page 281 - and it cost him a great deal to clothe so large a family." Of the most simple moral laws they seem to be entirely ignorant. It is not rare to see them employed as servants in offices considered below the peasant to perform. They never dream of eating with the rest of the household, but receive a morsel in their hands, and devour it where they can. Their dwellings are the merest huts, often without a single article of furniture. Having such difficulty in supporting themselves, as is manifested in...
Page 284 - I advised that we should not talk of political matters, but rather think of old times ; and his wife approved the suggestion. By and by came his sister, the young Countess Helene, the most beautiful Hungarian female I had ever seen ; and that is saying a great deal. St gave me his word of honour that we were perfectly safe from any surprise by the enemy, and my men were abundantly supplied with wine and meat; and, while they made themselves comfortable outside, I found myself in Paradise, between...
Page 292 - ... received me with distinguished courtesy. Could they have divined the thoughts that filled my heart, how different would have been my reception ! I handed my letter to Windischgratz ; he read it, and seemed struck with terror at its contents. I confess...

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