Fundamental Questions

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Macmillan, 1917 - Christianity - 256 pages
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Page 22 - Then, welcome each rebuff That turns earth's smoothness rough, Each sting that bids nor sit nor stand but go! Be our joys three-parts pain! Strive, and hold cheap the strain; Learn, nor account the pang; dare, never grudge the throe!
Page 124 - Love not the world, neither the things that are in the world. If any man love the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world. And the world passeth away, and the lust thereof: but he that doeth the will of God abideth for ever.
Page 8 - When we reflect on this struggle, we may console ourselves with the full belief, that the war of nature is not incessant, that no fear is felt, that death is generally prompt, and that the vigorous, the healthy, and the happy survive and multiply.
Page 121 - Speak, History ! who are Life's victors ? Unroll thy long annals, and say, Are they those whom the world called the victors — who won the success of a day? The martyrs, or Nero? The Spartans, who fell at Thermopylae's tryst, Or the Persians and Xerxes ? His judges or Socrates ? Pilate or Christ ? She.
Page 46 - It is not to taste sweet things, but to do noble and true things, and vindicate himself under God's Heaven as a god-made Man, that the poorest son of Adam dimly longs. Show him the way of doing that, the dullest daydrudge kindles into a hero.
Page 145 - For if any be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his natural face in a glass: For he beholdeth himself, and goeth his way, and straightway forgetteth what manner of man he was.
Page 247 - We believe these fundamental things: First, that every people has a right to choose the sovereignty under which they shall live.
Page 15 - When, for example, I imagine such carrion as the Brockton murder, I cannot conceive it as an act by which the universe, as a whole, logically and necessarily expresses its nature without shrinking from complicity with such a whole. And I deliberately refuse to keep on terms of loyalty with the universe by saying blankly that the murder, since it does flow from the nature of the whole, is not carrion.
Page 146 - For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
Page 146 - For ye, brethren, were called for freedom; only use not your freedom for an occasion to the flesh, but through love be servants one to another.

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