Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Sep 23, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 320 pages
2 Reviews

   From admired historian—and coiner of one of feminism's most popular slogans—Laurel Thatcher Ulrich comes an exploration of what it means for women to make history.

   In 1976, in an obscure scholarly article, Ulrich wrote, "Well behaved women seldom make history."  Today these words appear on t-shirts, mugs, bumper stickers, greeting cards, and all sorts of Web sites and blogs.  Ulrich explains how that happened and what it means by looking back at women of the past who challenged the way history was written.  She ranges from the fifteenth-century writer Christine de Pizan, who wrote The Book of the City of Ladies, to the twentieth century’s Virginia Woolf, author of A Room of One's Own.  Ulrich updates their attempts to reimagine female possibilities and looks at the women who didn't try to make history but did.  And she concludes by showing how the 1970s activists who created "second-wave feminism" also created a renaissance in the study of history.




From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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User Review  - mirikayla - LibraryThing

4.5 stars. There was so much information in here about amazing women in history! I loved it, and in the last twenty pages I made a long list of feminist classics I need to read (or reread, in the case ... Read full review

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User Review  - sbsolter - LibraryThing

I did not find Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History as engaging as I was expecting. Laurel Thatcher Ulrich inadvertently invented the slogan that is the title of this book; it was just a sentence in ... Read full review

Contents

Czapler
3
Czapter
40
Czapter Four
105
Czaptcr F
143
zapter
191
Afierword
249
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

LAUREL THATCHER ULRICH was born in Sugar City, Idaho. She holds degrees from the University of New Hampshire, University of Utah, and Simmons College. She is 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard University and past president of the American Historical Association. As a MacArthur Fellow, Ulrich worked on the PBS documentary based on her Pulitzer Prize-winning book A Midwife's Tale. Her work is also featured on an award-winning website called dohistory.org. She is immediate past president of the Mormon History Association. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.




From the Trade Paperback edition.

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