Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, Volume 15

Front Cover
The Association, 1900 - Philology, Modern
0 Reviews
Vols. for 1921-1969 include annual bibliography, called 1921-1955, American bibliography; 1956-1963, Annual bibliography; 1964-1968, MLA international bibliography.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 100 - The quality of mercy is not strained, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed: It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes...
Page 300 - Glory is like a circle in the water, Which never ceaseth to enlarge itself, Till, by broad spreading, it disperse to nought.
Page 99 - So nigh is grandeur to our dust, So near is God to man, When Duty whispers low, Thou must, The youth replies, I can...
Page 94 - CALM is the morn without a sound, Calm as to suit a calmer grief, And only thro' the faded leaf The chestnut pattering to the ground : Calm and deep peace on this high wold, And on these dews that drench the furze, And all the silvery gossamers That twinkle into green and gold : Calm and still light on yon great plain That sweeps with all its autumn bowers, And crowded...
Page 96 - No more — no more — no more" — (Such language holds the solemn sea To the sands upon the shore) Shall bloom the thunder-blasted tree, Or the stricken eagle soar! And all my days are trances, And all my nightly dreams Are where thy dark eye glances, And where thy footstep gleams — In what ethereal dances, By what eternal streams!
Page 175 - ... relaxations of his genius. This employment became his favourite by its facility ; the plan was ready to his hand, and nothing was required but to accommodate as he could the sentiments of an old author to recent facts or familiar images ; but what is easy is seldom excellent ; such imitations cannot give pleasure to common readers ; the man of learning may be sometimes surprised and delighted by an unexpected parallel; but the comparison requires knowledge of the original, which, will likewise...
Page 95 - And only thro' the faded leaf The chestnut pattering to the ground: Calm and deep peace on this high wold, And on these dews that drench the furze, And all the silvery gossamers That twinkle into green and gold: Calm and still light on yon great plain That sweeps with all its autumn bowers, And crowded farms and lessening towers, To mingle with the bounding main: Calm and deep peace in this wide air, These leaves that redden to the fall; And in my heart, if calm at all, If any calm, a calm despair:...
Page 120 - ... we may about the best way of teaching English literature we are likely to agree that this series is built in the main upon the right lines. It is unexceptionable in its outward form and habit. It gives us in every case a clearly printed text, sufficiently annotated, but not, as a rule, overweighted with pedantic comments ; a biographical and critical introduction ; a bibliography, through which the student can find his way to the literary and historical setting of the particular classic on which...
Page 191 - Farewell then verse, and love, and every toy, The rhymes and rattles of the man or boy ; What right, what true, what fit we justly call, Let this be all my care — for this is all . To lay this harvest up, and hoard with haste "What every day will want.
Page 97 - AFFECTIONS, Instincts, Principles, and Powers, Impulse and Reason, Freedom and Control — So men, unravelling God's harmonious whole, Rend in a thousand shreds this life of ours. Vain labour ! Deep and broad, where none may see, Spring the foundations of that shadowy throne Where man's one nature, queen-like, sits alone, Centred in a majestic unity...

Bibliographic information