The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Volume 1

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J. C. Nimmo, 1885
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Page 98 - If all the heavenly quintessence they still From their immortal flowers of poesy, Wherein, as in a mirror, we perceive The highest reaches of a human wit ; If these had made one poem's period, And all combined in beauty's worthiness, Yet should there hover in their restless heads One thought, one grace, one wonder, at the least, Which into words no virtue can digest...
Page 52 - Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.
Page 288 - You stars that reign'd at my nativity, Whose influence hath allotted death and hell, Now draw up Faustus, like a foggy mist...
Page 287 - Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of Heaven, That time may cease, and midnight never come; Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again and make Perpetual day; or let this hour be but A year, a month, a week, a natural day, That Faustus may repent and save his soul! O lente, lente currite, noctis equi! The stars move still, time runs, the clock will strike, The Devil will come, and Faustus must be damned.
Page xxvi - Nature that fram'd us of four elements, Warring within our breasts for regiment, Doth teach us all to have aspiring minds.
Page 289 - That sometime grew within this learned man. Faustus is gone: regard his hellish fall, Whose fiendful fortune may exhort the wise, Only to wonder at unlawful things, Whose deepness doth entice such forward wits To practise more than heavenly power permits.
Page 199 - There is a God, full of revenging wrath, From whom the thunder and the lightning breaks, Whose scourge I am, and Him will I obey.
Page lxvii - With neither of them that take offence was I acquainted, and with one of them I care not if I never be...
Page 219 - In heavenly matters of theology ; Till swoln with cunning, of a self-conceit, His waxen wings did mount above his reach, And. melting, heavens conspir'd his overthrow; For, falling to a devilish exercise, And glutted now with learning's golden gifts, He surfeits upon cursed necromancy; Nothing so sweet as magic is to him, Which he prefers before his chiefest bliss: And this the man that in his study sits.
Page 287 - O spare me, Lucifer! — Where is it now? 'tis gone; and see where God Stretcheth out his arm, and bends his ireful brows!

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