Toledo: An Historical and Descriptive Account of the "City of Generations;"

Front Cover
J. Lane, 1907 - Art - 169 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Popular passages

Page 158 - A spirit and a vision are not, as the modern philosophy supposes, a cloudy vapour or a nothing; they are organized and minutely articulated beyond all that the mortal and perishing nature can produce. He who does not imagine in stronger and better lineaments, and in stronger and better light than his perishing mortal eye can see, does not imagine at all.
Page 149 - Nobles, discretos varones Que gobernáis a Toledo, En aquestos escalones Desechad las aficiones, Codicias, amor y miedo. Por los comunes provechos Dejad los particulares: Pues vos fizo Dios pilares De tan riquísimos techos, Estad firmes y derechos.
Page 108 - French archbishop, who at the time occupied the see, would be of all men the least likely to sympathize with Moresque work, and the most anxious to employ a French artist. But, however this may have been, the church is thoroughly French in its ground-plan and equally French in all its details for some height from the ground ; and it is not until we reach the triforium of the choir that any other influence is visible : but even here the work is French work, only slightly modified by some acquaintance...
Page 53 - ... subdivided into nine compartments by four very low circular columns, which are about a foot in diameter. Their capitals are some of those of which I have just spoken ; they are all different, and, it seemed to me, more like Moorish work than the other capitals of the same class at San Roman and Sta. Cruz. The arches, of which four spring from each capital, are all of the round horseshoe form ; above them is a string-course, and all the intermediate walls are carried up to the same height as the...
Page 93 - The capitals are of stucco and elaborately designed with floral devices, in which the fir-cone is conspicuous ; there is a vague suggestion of Byzantine influence. Mr. Street imagines them to be much later than the original capitals which they overlay. " All the Moorish decorative work seems to have been executed in the same way in plaster. This was of very fine quality, and was evidently cut and carved as if it had been stone, and seldom, if ever, l think, stamped or moulded, according to the mistaken...
Page 51 - ... judge, in every respect but their faith so much the superiors of their Christian contemporaries. An apse has been added for the altar, but this is evidently a much later addition to the old mosque. The exterior face of the walls is built of brick and rough stone. The lower part of the side wall being arcaded with three round arches, within the centre of which is a round horseshoe arch for a doorway ; above is a continuous sunk arcade of cusped arches, within which are window openings with round...
Page 139 - REINOS; EL DICHO SEÑOR, REY Y SEÑOR NATURAL DE LOS REINOS DE ARAGÓN Y CECILIA, Y SEYENDO LA DICHA SEÑORA, REINA Y SEÑORA NATURAL DE LOS REINOS DE CASTILLA Y LEÓN; EL CUAL FUNDARON A GLORIA DE NUESTRO SEÑOR Y DE LA BIENAVENTURADA MADRE SUYA NUESTRA SEÑORA LA VIRGEN MARÍA, Y POR ESPECIAL DEVOCIÓN QUE TUVIERON. En la zona inferior de los lienzos de muro están los arcos peaños que sirven de ingreso a las capillas. Estos son ojivales, se adornan con...
Page 129 - The vestments preserved here, to the number of forty sets, belong mostly to the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and are of the most splendid description. " Each set [says Riano] generally includes a chasuble, dalmatic, cope, altar frontal, covers for the gospel stands, and other smaller pieces. The embroideries on the orphreys, which are formed of figures of saints, are as perfect as the miniatures on illuminated MSS.
Page 126 - ... the centre is an ornament of amethysts and diamonds. Eight other jewels appear on each side of enamelled gold, emeralds, and large rubies ; a variety of other jewels are placed at intervals round the mantle, and at the lower part are the arms of Cardinal Sandoval [seventeenth century] enamelled on gold and studded with sapphires and rubies. The centre of this mantle is covered with flowers and pomegranates embroidered in seed-pearls of different sizes. Round the borders are rows of large pearls....
Page 107 - I have shown, is the case with the cathedrals at Burgos, at Leon, and at Santiago, and such even more decidedly is the case here. Moreover, in Toledo, if anywhere, was such a circumstance as this to be expected. In this part of Spain there was in the thirteenth century no trained school of native artists. Even after the conquest the Moors continued, as has been said before, to act as architects for Christian buildings whether secular or ecclesiastical, and, indeed, to...

Bibliographic information