Ame Sam E Rromane Dz̆ene

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Univ of Hertfordshire Press, 2002 - History - 180 pages
9 Reviews
'We are the Romani people' is intended primarily as a source book for teachers, social workers and others interacting with Romanies ('Gypsies') in - or from - Central and Eastern Europe, but will be invaluable to anybody who wants to know more about these fascinating people who left India a thousand years ago. It presents the most current findings about Romani origins, an overview of politics, culture, language and cuisine, a surprising list of notable people of Romani descent, a description of the centuries-long period of slavery in the Balkans and a brief description of the Romani Holocaust. Especially useful is the chapter on how to interact with Romanies, and the list of recommended readings. Each chapter is accompanied by a list of questions, making it suitable as a textbook for use in class.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mvbdlr - LibraryThing

This is an average introduction into the study of the Roma/Gypsies. It is written in elementary language with a lot of basic information. I had a feeling it was meant for young children to read. It ... Read full review

Review: We Are the Romani People: Volume 28

User Review  - Jeannette - Goodreads

This is a book in it's own class and it's a shame that more people won't have read it. It tells you everything you could/would ever want to know about the Romani people (Gypsies). Of course I have a ... Read full review

Contents

History
1
Slavery
17
Out into Europe
29
Explaining antigypsyism
53
The Gypsy image
64
How European are Romanies?
77
How to interact with Romanies
91
The emergence of Romani organizations
115
Our language
139
Works referenced in the text
166
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Ian Hancock was born in the United Kingdom of British and Hungarian Romani descent and has been active in the Romani movement since the 1960s. He is professor of Romani Studies and director of the Romani Archives and Documentation Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

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