Clinician's Pocket Drug Reference 2008

Front Cover
McGraw Hill Professional, Mar 3, 2008 - Medical - 288 pages
2 Reviews
  • Huge Market: medical students, residents, doctors, physician assistant students, nurse practitioners, dental students
  • New to this edition: first time coverage of 25 new drugs, patient safety icons
  • Unique in the marketplace in that it focuses solely on the drugs most commonly used by interns and physicians
 

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Great small reference guide

User Review  - sfergs - Overstock.com

This is exactly what I was looking for. I am a new RN and I needed something to fit inside my clipboard for quick drug reference and this book is it! It is only about the size of the palm of your hand ... Read full review

Not what I expected

User Review  - marybeth7554 - Overstock.com

I was looking to replace my PDR which was outdated. I thought this book would be a similar publication and it was not. Read full review

Contents

Tables
223
Index
249
Copyright

Popular passages

Page xiii - ... trimesters. CATEGORY B Animal studies have not demonstrated a risk to the fetus, but there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. or Animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have not demonstrated a risk to the fetus during the first trimester of pregnancy and there is no evidence of risk in the last two trimesters.
Page xiii - C: Animal studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus, but there are no adequate studies in humans; the benefits from the use of the drug in pregnant women may be acceptable despite its potential risks. Or there are no animal reproduction studies and no adequate studies in humans.
Page xiii - ... trimesters. Category B: Animal studies have not demonstrated a risk to the fetus, but there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Or animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have not demonstrated a risk to the fetus during the first trimester of pregnancy, and there is no evidence of risk in later trimesters.
Page 6 - Benazepril (Lotensin) Captopril (Capoten) Enalapril (Vasotec) Fosinopril (Monopril) Lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) Moexipril (Univasc) Perindopril...
Page xix - ... os (nothing by mouth) NSAID nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug PA posteroanterior PIP proximal interphalangeal PBS peripheral blood smear PE physical exam PFTs pulmonary function tests PMI point of maximal intensity PMN polymorphonuclear leukocyte PT prothrombin time PTCA percutaneous transluminal angioplasty PTH parathyroid hormone PTT partial thromboplastin time PUD peptic ulcer disease RBC red blood cell RPR rapid plasma reagin RR respiratory rate RS Reed-Sternberg (cell) RV...
Page 86 - Lactic acidosis & severe hepatomegaly with steatosis, including fatal cases, have been reported with the use of nucleoside analogs alone or in combo w/ other antiretrovirals.
Page 6 - Normodyne) Metoprolol (Lopressor. Toprol XL) Nadolol (Corgard) Penbutolol (Levatol) Pindolol (Visken) Propranolol (Inderal) Timolol (Blocadren) Calcium Channel Antagonists Amlodipine (Norvasc) Diltiazem (Cardizem.

About the author (2008)

Leonard G. Gomella, MD, FACS, The Bernard W. Godwin, Jr. Professor and Chairman, Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College; Associate Director of Clinical Affairs, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson Hospital, Philadelphia, PA

Steven A. Haist, MD, MS, FACP, Professor of Medicine and Associate Chair for Education and Residency Program Director, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY

Aimee G. Adams, PharmD, Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy and Department of Internal Medicine, and Clinical Specialist, Primary Care, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY

Kelly M. Smith, PharmD, FASHP, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy; Clinical Specialist, Medication Use Policy, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY

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