A New Method of Measuring Heights by Means of the Barometer

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1882 - Altitudes - 162 pages
 

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Page 564 - ... extending a hundred leagues from the Rio del Norte to the Nueces; and the Quiviras from the Nueces northward to an unknown distance. There are indications, however, in his own narrative, that his Rio Nueces was not the stream now bearing that name, but the Colorado or even Brazos, farther north ; and that such was the case is shown by the fact that the Tejas were found in later years between the Colorado and Trinidad; though the Jumanas were found as far south as the Guadalupe. In the matter...
Page 555 - For a distance of one and one-half miles west from the place where the last section was made, as far as Jimtown School, a massive sandstone outcrops in the south bank of the river to a height of more than 100 feet above the level of the flood plain. The foot of the bluff is concealed by talus, so that the full thickness of the sandstone could not be seen, but it can not be less than 60 feet and probably in places reaches 80 feet. This is doubtless the continuation of the sandstone exposed in picturesque...
Page 503 - Glacial Brick Clays of Rhode Island and South-eastern Massachusetts," by NS Shaler, JB Woodworth, and CF Marbut; "The Faunal Relations of the Eocene and Upper Cretaceous of the Pacific Coast,
Page 414 - The annual progress of the sun from tropic to tropic throws a preponderance of heat first on one side of the equator and then on the other, which produces an annual cycle of changes in the pressure, and gives rise to what has been called the ANNUAL GRADIENT. The amount of this variation is quite small, but increases rapidly toward the poles ; at the equator it rarely exceeds one quarter...
Page 396 - Class of 1894 TEACHER OF GEOLOGY AT HARVARD FROM 1894 TO 1925 The Gift of GS HOLDEN RW SAYLES RAF PENROSE E. WIGGLESWORTH 1926...
Page 406 - The pressure of the atmosphere upon the surface of the earth at the level of the sea is about fifteen pounds to the square inch.
Page 492 - ... HARVARD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES LIBRARY Transferred to CABOT SCIENCE LIBRARY June 2005 Department of Mineralogy & Petrorērapļiy HARVARD UNIVERSITY Cambridge, MASS.
Page 407 - A glass tube about thirty-three inches long, closed at one end, is filled with mercury, and then inverted with its open end in a cup of the same fluid metal.
Page 551 - It is, however, not certain that any part of the cape was above the level of the sea at the time when the retreat of the ice took place.
Page 559 - Vineyard the drift abounds, in a remarkable manner, in masses of chalcedony, some of which are a foot or more in diameter. The pebbles are...

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