The Bride of Lammermoor

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Classic Books Company, 2001 - 544 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
25
III
39
IV
55
V
65
VI
87
VII
99
VIII
121
XX
287
XXI
302
XXII
321
XXIII
346
XXIV
361
XXV
373
XXVI
391
XXVII
407

IX
138
X
159
XI
173
XII
183
XIII
201
XIV
212
XV
223
XVI
236
XVII
247
XVIII
256
XIX
275
XXVIII
417
XXIX
423
XXX
433
XXXI
443
XXXII
453
XXXIII
458
XXXIV
471
XXXV
487
XXXVI
503
XXXVII
505
XXXVIII
506

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Page xiv - If a woman also vow a vow unto the Lord, and bind herself by a bond, being in her father's house in her youth ; " And her father hear her vow, and her bond wherewith she hath bound her soul, and her father shall hold his peace at her : then all her vows shall stand, and every bond wherewith she hath...
Page xv - But if her father disallow her in the day that he heareth; not any of her vows, or of her bonds wherewith she hath bound her soul, shall stand: and the LORD shall forgive her, because her father disallowed her.
Page 3 - I'll win your bread, And spindles and whorles for them wha need, Whilk is a gentle trade indeed, To carry the gaberlunzie on. I'll bow my leg, and crook my knee, And draw a black clout o'er my e'e ; A cripple or blind they will ca' me, While we shall be merry and sing.

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About the author (2001)

Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of a writer. As a young boy, he contracted polio and was sent to his grandfather's farm to recuperate. While there, he came to know and love the Border country, which figures prominently in his work. Scott began his literary career by writing metrical tales. "The Lay of the Last Minstrel," "Marmion," and "The Lady of the Lake" made him the most popular poet of his day. Sixty-five hundred copies of "The Lay of the Last Minstrel" were sold in the first three years, a record sale for poetry. His later romances in verse, "The Vision of Don Roderick," "Rokeby," and "The Lord of the Isles," met with waning interest owing to the rivalry of Byron, whose more passionate poetic romances superseded Scott's in the public favor. Scott then abandoned poetry for prose. In 1814 he anonymously published a historical novel, Waverly, or, Sixty Years Since, the first of the series known as the Waverley novels. He wrote 23 novels anonymously during the next 13 years. The first master of historical fiction, Scott wrote novels that are historical in background rather than in character: A fictitious person always holds the foreground. In their historical sequence, the Waverley novels range in setting from the year 1090, the time of the First Crusade, to 1700, the period covered in St. Roman's Well (1824), set in a Scottish watering place. Scott wrote novels covering every period of European history from the eleventh to nineteenth centuries, except the thirteenth century. Scott's last years were plagued by illness, yet in 1831 and 1832 he toured the Mediterranean aboard a government frigate. He died at Abbotsford soon after his return and was buried in the ruins of Dryburgh Abbey.

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