Biographical preface. Omar Khayyám's grave. Ohmar Khayyám's life. Ohmar Khayyám's Rubáiyát. Life of Jámí. Jámś Salámán and Absál. Appendix. Agamemnon. Euphranor. Polonius. Essays on Crabbe

Front Cover
Houghton, Mifflin & Company; [etc., etc.,], 1887
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - I sometimes think that never blows so red The Rose as where some buried Caesar bled; That every Hyacinth the Garden wears Dropt in her Lap from some once lovely Head.
Page 165 - Was this the face that launched a thousand ships, And burnt the topless towers of Ilium?
Page 408 - A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings and suffocations are the most dangerous in the body, and it is not much otherwise in the mind...
Page 357 - In the discharge of thy place set before thee the best examples; for imitation is a globe of precepts. And after a time set before thee thine own example; and examine thyself strictly whether thou didst not best at first. Neglect not also the examples of those that have carried themselves ill in the same place; not to set off thyself by taxing their memory, but to direct thyself what to avoid.
Page 27 - They say the Lion and the Lizard keep The Courts where Jamshyd gloried and drank deep: And Bahrain, that great Hunter — the Wild Ass Stamps o'er his Head, but cannot break his Sleep.
Page 33 - Into this Universe, and why not knowing, Nor whence, like Water willy-nilly flowing : And out of it, as Wind along the Waste, I know not whither, willy-nilly blowing.
Page 23 - Each Morn a thousand Roses brings, you say; Yes, but where leaves the Rose of Yesterday? And this first Summer month that brings the Rose Shall take Jamshyd and Kaikobad away.
Page 29 - Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend, Before we too into the Dust descend; Dust into Dust, and under Dust to lie, Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and — sans End!
Page 46 - You know, my Friends, with what a brave Carouse I made a Second Marriage in my house ; Divorced old barren Reason from my Bed, And took the Daughter of the Vine to Spouse. LVI For 'Is' and 'IS-NOT' though with Rule and Line, And 'UP-AND-DOWN...
Page 406 - Studies serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring ; for ornament, is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business.

Bibliographic information